Bacterial makeup could explain gender-based disease-risk differences

01/21/2013 | Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model)

Women may be more prone to autoimmune diseases because the bacteria in their guts differs from those in men's bodies, according to research published in the journal Science. The study found that male and female mice have different types of bacteria, which affect each gender's chemistry and, therefore, the likelihood of developing an autoimmune disease. Scientists also discovered that transferring bacteria from a male mouse to a female helps the latter develop protection against the development of diabetes.

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