Research: Genetics in larger animals may protect them against cancer

01/22/2013 | Nature

Larger animals may have developed a gene that helps suppress the risk of developing cancer, despite having a larger body mass, according to findings published in Evolutionary Applications. Using a model with two genetic types, biologists at the Institute of Research for Development in Montpellier, France, are attempting to understand the theory that Peto's paradox, the absence of a correlation between likelihood of cancer and an animal's body mass, could be attributed to the larger animal's ability to protect itself against the disease.

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