Study shows infection-control practices perceived as most effective

02/5/2013

A survey of infection-control specialists at 478 U.S. hospitals helped Michigan researchers create a list of the most common infection-control practices based on strength of evidence. The report in the American Journal of Infection Control found alcohol-based hand rub and aseptic urinary catheter insertion were among those perceived as the most effective practices, while routine central catheter changes and nitrofurazone-releasing urinary catheters were among the practices perceived as the least effective.

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