How to encourage students to think critically about history

02/8/2013 | SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Education

Teaching history should focus on narratives, not memorizing facts and dates, writes Craig Perrier, high-school social studies specialist for Fairfax County Public Schools in Fairfax, Va. In this blog post, Perrier shares examples of the standard narrative found in history textbooks, as well as alternative narratives that could be shared with students. "Teaching history through narratives focuses on knowledge construction, resource evaluation and active learning. These skills speak to the demands of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, global competency and 21st-century education," he writes.

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