CDC report shows racial, gender differences in cancer incidence

02/21/2013 | HealthDay News

The number of people in the U.S. who were diagnosed with invasive cancer in 2009 was 1.5 million, with prostate, breast, lung and colon cancer accounting for more than 50% of all cases, a CDC report showed. Researchers wrote in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report that men were more likely to have malignancies than women and that blacks were at greater risk for cancer than whites. They also found geographic disparities in cancer incidence, with the South recording higher caseloads of colon and lung cancers.

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