Peptide may usher nanoparticles past immune system into tumors

02/25/2013 | Nature (free content)

University of Pennsylvania researchers have designed molecules bearing a segment of the membrane protein CD47, which tricks macrophages into allowing drug-bearing nanoparticles into blood cells, according to a study published in Science. The researchers designed a 21-amino-acid peptide based on the CD47 sequence and attached it to polystyrene nanobeads that also included a dye that can be identified using fluorescence spectroscopy. Tests on mice showed the nanobeads sneak past immune cells and accumulate in tumors. Researchers hope the technique can be improved to employ customized nanobeads.

View Full Article in:

Nature (free content)

Published in Brief:

SmartBrief Job Listings for Health Care

Job Title Company Location
Clinical Trials Agreements Specialist (209955)
The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine Inc.
Rockville, MD
SAFETY, HEALTH, and ENVIRONMENTAL (SHE) REGIONAL SPECIALIST
Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc.
Newark, CA
Catheter Engineer
ASAHI INTECC, Orange County CA R&D Center
Santa Ana, CA
MANAGER MEDICAL GAS COMPLIANCE AND SAFETY
Matheson Tri-Gas, Inc.
Houston, TX
Neurovascular Intervention Product Sales Rep, North East
ASAHI INTECC
Multiple Locations, SL_Multiple Locations