Study finds need for greater prenatal screening for infection

02/28/2012

Not enough pregnant women are getting recommended screening for infections that can be transmitted to their babies, and many who test positive are not getting the treatment they -- and their infants -- need, according to a study in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. The findings, based on two population-based surveys of U.S. labor and delivery records in 2003 and 2004, demonstrate the need for better adherence to clinical guidelines. Pre-delivery screening rates were more than 90% for hepatitis B and rubella, but needed improvement for syphilis (80%), group B streptococcus (72-85%) and chlamydia and gonorrhea (less than 80%). Less than half of women who tested positive for rubella or syphilis received recommended treatment. Read the abstract.

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http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(11)01148-3/abstract

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