Change the way you look at mistakes

It's important to treat employees as experts, trust them to do the right thing and ask questions instead of making assumptions, writes Josh Patrick of Stage 2 Planning Partners. For this approach to work, leaders must accept the fact that their employees will occasionally make mistakes. "Instead of thinking of mistakes as problems, we started thinking of them as learning opportunities," Patrick writes.

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