Study: Rhinoceros beetle horns are hollow

03/13/2013 | LiveScience.com

The elaborate horn perched atop the heads of a rhinoceros beetle may be a weapon against its enemies, but it comes at little cost for the insect itself, according to a study. Scientists found that the horn, about two-thirds the insect's size, is dry and hollow, making it easy for the beetle to move and fly unimpeded. "This is not what I was expecting, but it's actually a nice simple explanation for my big interest in why we see so much diversity in these horns," said the study's lead researcher. "There's a big benefit to having these horns, but I haven't found any evidence for any cost."

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