Study ties carnitine in meat to heart disease risk

04/9/2013 | CBS News

Eating red meat encourages the growth of gut bacteria that break down a compound called carnitine, which raises the risk of atherosclerosis by increasing levels of trimethylamine-N-oxide, or TMAO, Cleveland Clinic researchers reported in the journal Nature Medicine. The study found that increasing carnitine levels in people who had high levels of TMAO raised their risk of stroke, heart attack and other cardiovascular events.

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