Plugged in, checked out: The imbalance of work and home

Technology increasingly ties workers to their jobs, even after normal working hours. But some employees are pushing back, refusing to answer e-mails, cellphone calls or file reports in the hours they spend at home with spouses and children. "That's going to impact your equilibrium and your well-being," says Nikisha Ware, executive director for the Mississippi Learning Institute at Jackson State University, who says she's a "transformed workaholic." Now, she says, she's "made a conscious effort this year not to do any work after 5."

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Clarion-Ledger (Jackson, Miss.) (tiered subscription model), The

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