Study finds gender bias in perceptions of scientific research

04/22/2013 | HealthDay News

Graduate students in communications who were asked to read research abstracts from a variety of disciplines were more likely to rate abstracts "important," "innovative" and of high quality if the authors were two males instead of two females, researchers report in the journal Science Communication. Abstracts in male-dominated disciplines such as political communication, computer science and journalism, were rated more highly when listed authors were male. "There's still a stereotype in our society that science is a more appropriate career for men than it is for women," lead author Silvia Knobloch-Westerwick said.

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