Study links psychological factors to post-trauma chronic pain

05/8/2013 | American News Report

Responses to stress and other psychological factors may contribute more to chronic pain after a traumatic event than a lingering injury itself, University of North Carolina researchers reported in the journal Pain. Study author Dr. Samuel McLean said the study suggests "something goes wrong with the body's 'fight or flight' response" or its recovery after a traumatic event.

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