Study links lower-heat cooking, reduced insulin resistance

08/23/2013 | Medscape (free registration)

Overweight women who ate foods cooked at lower temperatures consumed less fat, had reduced insulin resistance and showed better insulin sensitivity index and fasting insulin levels at four weeks compared with those who ate foods cooked at higher temperatures, a study on the website of Diabetes Care found. Researchers said higher-heat cooking triggers the production of advanced glycation end products, which were linked to inflammation and diabetes.

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