Study explores why women have heart disease later in life than men

09/25/2013 | HealthDay News

Women generally develop heart disease a decade later than men, possibly because their bodies can better counter the effects of insulin resistance, researchers reported in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Stanford University researchers found that women younger than 50 had lower blood pressure, glucose and triglycerides than men, but the differences disappeared in study participants ages 51 and up.

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