Study: Pregnancy-onset snoring increases risk of hypertension

12/11/2012

Women who begin chronic snoring -- a sign of sleep-disordered breathing -- during pregnancy are at increased risk of cardiovascular problems that can harm them and their baby, concludes a study in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. Researchers found that women with pregnancy-onset snoring were 2.36 times more likely to develop gestational hypertension and 1.59 times more likely to develop preeclampsia, compared to non-snoring pregnant women. While all women who snored were at increased risk, those with pregnancy-onset snoring were at greatest risk. At the same time, no independent association was found between pregnancy-onset snoring and gestational diabetes. Among 1,719 third-trimester prospective study, 34% reported habitual snoring (at least 3-4 times per week), while 25% report that snoring began during pregnancy. The authors conclude that simple screening of pregnant women for snoring could potentially help identify women who at high risk for hypertensive disorders. Read the abstract.

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http://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(12)00914-3/abstract

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