Sibling conflicts may affect teens' emotions, study finds

12/25/2012 | DoctorsLounge.com

Teenagers who fight with their siblings about "invasion of the personal domain" are more likely to have higher anxiety levels and lower self-esteem a year later, a study in the journal Child Development found. Teens who have equality and fairness conflicts with their siblings were more likely to show depressive moods later on. Accommodating teens' privacy and equality needs might help their emotional adjustment, the researchers said.

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