HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/25/2017

Be open to new ideas and never be afraid to fail, says Kathleen Hogan, chief people officer for Microsoft. "I am a firm believer in having a growth mindset -- remind yourself that it's OK to fail if you learn from your failures," she says.

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USA Today
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Microsoft, Kathleen Hogan
7/25/2017

You might not mean to offend by saying "no problem," but the phrase can communicate that you're a little resentful about being asked to complete a certain task, argues Judith Humphrey. Other phrases to avoid around the office include "it is what it is," which is an empty expression that can suggest you're not engaged, Humphrey writes.

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Fast Company online
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Judith Humphrey
7/25/2017

You can quickly improve your resume by highlighting important projects you've worked on or honors that you've achieved, writes Benjamin Snyder. Make sure to include a URL for your LinkedIn profile and include keywords that are relevant to the position you're applying for, Snyder writes.

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CNBC
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Benjamin Snyder, LinkedIn
7/25/2017

One of the best ways to avoid procrastination is to put your most difficult tasks at the top of your to-do list, writes Jeffrey Hayzlett. Whatever you do, avoid checking your social media accounts and even move to a quieter work space if necessary.

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Entrepreneur online
7/25/2017

Help grieving workers by monitoring their workload after their return from bereavement and referring them to a health provider if necessary, writes Kim Pattullo, a partner at Addleshaw Goddard. The effects of a family member's death can also be financial, Pattullo writes.

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CIPD (U.K.)
7/25/2017

Contrary to old perceptions about HR, the profession helps business by engaging employees, using feedback to find solutions and focusing on talent development, writes David Mendlewicz, CEO of Butterfly. "One area where companies can improve is educating junior to mid-level managers in leadership," he writes.

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Workforce online
7/25/2017

To help your company change for the better, diagnose your current culture and where you'd like to be, and emphasize the importance of company leaders' participation, writes Andi Simon, a corporate anthropologist. "Once you begin to realize that more of the same is not going to build better results, you need a process to change how people think about their work life and habits," Simon writes.

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Andi Simon
7/25/2017

Build an ideal workplace culture by asking employees for ideas, celebrating their lives outside of work and offering wellness programs to support a healthful lifestyle, writes Jeff Cates, president of Intuit Canada. "To become a great place to work, leaders must put their employees first and place their fulfillment and well-being at the heart of every business decision," he writes.

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Jeff Cates, Intuit Canada
7/25/2017

Improve the quality of your learning programs by offering self-directed training that's flexible and easily accessible, and encouraging employees to approach career development like entrepreneurs, writes Ruth Veloria, executive dean for the University of Phoenix School of Business.

7/25/2017

Ericsson hosts an event annually on the streets of Stockholm to recruit interns and to pique interest in the company and a career in science, technology, engineering and math. At this year's event, 90 interns passed out lists of available positions to interested pedestrians, talked with people at metro stations and completed fun challenges to demonstrate the company's positive culture, writes Ericsson's Anders Oesterlund.

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Training magazine
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Ericsson