HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/18/2018

Data show 879 CEOs have left this year, 152 of them female and 727 male. There have been 716 replacements identified, with 161 of them female, which Challenger, Gray & Christmas says means representation is improving.

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Entrepreneur online
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Gray
9/18/2018

HR leaders should listen to co-workers, have the courage to accept their ideas and try to influence others instead of telling them what to do, says Dermot O'Brien, chief transformation officer for ADP and former chief HR officer. "My big callout to the HR community is to be the beacon for the function who says that we live our values and we drive positive engagement cultures," he says.

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LinkedIn
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ADP
9/18/2018

Specializing is fine, but it's by leveraging your strengths toward generalist roles that you can become an executive, says Dylan Choong, chief HR officer for Sephora Southeast Asia and Pacific. "Becoming a successful CHRO isn't a straight path where you check off a list of experiences in order to become one, and so saying that you need to wait 10 or 15 years to be a CHRO is a fallacy," Choong says.

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Sephora
9/18/2018

HR C-suite leaders at BlackRock, Accenture, Johnson & Johnson and other companies discussed the importance of diversity, how culture connects to business and other topics at a recent event. "We, as HR leaders, need to both understand the business strategy and ensure employees can have a voice in that," says Jayne Parker, chief HR officer at Disney.

9/18/2018

Improve HR with marketing techniques that use data and analytics to focus on employees' individual needs and talents, writes Peter Hinssen.

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Forbes
9/18/2018

A McKinsey study says HR leaders influence the business when they create a positive employee experience, understand strategy and use data and analytics to make hiring decisions, writes Margaret O'Hanlon.

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Margaret O'Hanlon
9/18/2018

Companies need a strong leadership training program that focuses on values, culture and improvement, writes Jason Forrest, CEO of Forrest Performance Group. "The most successful companies know that what really matters is their ability to develop leadership in the people they lead," Forrest writes.

9/18/2018

Radio Flyer aims to make sure its employees have their favorite job ever, says Amy Bastuga, the company's senior vice president of HR. The business connects work duties to the company's mission, hires creative and dedicated employees, offers flexible benefits and recognizes good work, she says.

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Forbes
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Amy Bastuga
9/18/2018

Think about room for salary growth with new employees, as well as how you'll handle departures, writes Greg Shepard, chief strategy officer at Pepperjam. "Cross-training staff gives everyone a better understanding of how a department works, and it can also help employees pick up the slack if someone leaves unexpectedly," he writes.

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HR Dive
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Greg Shepard, Pepperjam
9/18/2018

When seeking on-the-job feedback, avoid common mistakes that may skew the information, such as fishing for compliments, focusing on things that can't change, or ignoring harsh criticism. Prioritize feedback from colleagues who aren't necessarily nice to you, suggests professor of business psychology Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, as this helps bring to the fore weaknesses and criticisms that can then be worked on.

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Fast Company online
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Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic