HR & Career
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/19/2017

If you show up more than 15 minutes early for your interview or give the impression that you're reaching for perfect answers, you'll seem as if you're trying too hard, writes Robin Reshwan. Also, avoid following up several times after the interview, which can make you seem desperate.

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Robin Reshwan
10/19/2017

Prospective homeowners can now buy a move-in ready tiny home from Amazon and have it delivered at their convenience. The $36,000 prefabricated house costs $3,754 to ship.

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Today
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Amazon
10/19/2017

Lincoln Financial Group HR chief Lisa Buckingham joined during the financial crisis and, over the years, has been tasked with such strategic goals as adding diversity, creating a digital strategy and establishing coaching and talent-management programs.

10/19/2017

The allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein show that HR needs to be independent of management, enact zero-tolerance harassment policies and provide a path for whistleblowers, writes Kelvin Ong. "When you see or hear a credible report of inappropriate behavior, you should have a specific person you can talk to or a number to call that you keep in a visible place," Ark Markman writes.

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Harvey Weinstein
10/19/2017

Take the time to reflect on what your HR career means to you and examine what you do well and what you need to fix, writes Jane Horan. "The next step is to share the results with a business partner or colleague with experience in the myriad areas of HR," she writes.

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HRM Asia (Singapore)
10/19/2017

You can meet your company's HR goals with limited resources by striving to align strategies and priorities, writes Reed Deshler. Achieving that state requires making sure all departments are working toward the same result, Deshler writes.

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Reed Deshler
10/19/2017

To support the environment while building your business, look at available resources and the time needed to meet challenges, writes John Elkington, chairman at Volans. "A key skill for all of us driving change is to recognize the frames shaping other people's worldviews and priorities -- and, equally important, to understand and evolve our own frames," he writes.

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John Elkington, Volans
10/19/2017

To help bring more women into top management, HR should set up unconscious bias training and mentoring and sponsorship programs, and senior leaders should set goals for hiring and promoting women, executives and HR leaders say. "At the management level we have a really critical need to upscale managers, women and men, to really be advocates of diversity and inclusion," says Alexis Krivkovich, a partner at McKinsey & Co.

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McKinsey & Co
10/19/2017

Improve the office experience for introverted employees by asking them how they like to receive information and offering flexible work schedules, including the option of working remotely, writes Morra Aarons-Mele. Also, don't force employees to participate in interactive office activities.

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Fast Company online
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Morra
10/19/2017

Pay employees accordingly to establish a performance-based culture in your business, advises Robert Glazer of Acceleration Partners. Ensure new staff members fit into your team, use salary as motivation and base promotions on actual merit.

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Entrepreneur online