Leadership
Top editor picks, summarized for you
12/8/2016

An ill-defined networking meeting in a coffee shop is not the most effective or productive use of your time, writes Ryan Estis. He suggests early breakfast meetings, preparing an agenda and saving alcohol for celebrations, among other practices.

More Summaries:
Ryan Estis
12/8/2016

Robots will displace millions of jobs, but they could improve the economy overall as a supplement to aging workforces, Ruchir Sharma writes. While the societal upheaval of automation cannot be discounted, James Pethokoukis argues, robot work could give "workers more time to focus on the creative, design, or emotion-driven parts of their work."

More Summaries:
Ruchir Sharma, James Pethokoukis
12/8/2016

We develop filters to explain the world in shorthand, but such filters can sometimes lead us to make incorrect or unfair assumptions, writes Steve McKee. "It's almost as if we choose to assume the worst about people, making no room for different contexts or honest disagreements, and assuming others have nefarious motives," he writes.

Full Story:
SmartBrief/Leadership
More Summaries:
Steve McKee
12/8/2016

The relationship between being organized and being more productive is not so solid, according to researchers such as Tim Harford. He hypothesizes that messiness may actually support certain types of creativity.

Full Story:
Farnam Street
More Summaries:
Tim Harford
12/8/2016

Executives and boards must take the lead in protecting against cybersecurity threats, writes Michael Coden. This includes practicing incident response, conducting cyberattack simulations and applying that knowledge toward a strategy.

Full Story:
World Economic Forum
12/8/2016

The act of paltering is popular in business and politics as a way of using truthful statements to distort or deceive. "People who palter may gain some ground in negotiating a better deal for themselves in the short run, but if their cunning ways are discovered, they can do long-term damage to relationships," writes Dina Gerdeman.

Full Story:
HBS Working Knowledge
More Summaries:
Dina Gerdeman
12/8/2016

Longtime bank executive Janet Olson notes that banking is about trusting relationships, even if that doesn't always mean perfect harmony. "From time to time you need to be able to be able to have difficult conversations, and sometimes you have to agree to disagree," she says.

12/8/2016

Naturally produced black tar balls that appear on beaches can feed microorganisms and help sustain the oceanic ecosystem. "It's part of the natural environment, but it clearly structures that environment, so it's useful to know about this because oil production could change the amount of natural seepage," says Dave Valentine, a petroleum researcher.

Full Story:
The Atlantic online
More Summaries:
oil production
12/8/2016

Republicans on the House Financial Services Committee, led by Rep. Bill Huizenga, R-Mich., are adjusting the Financial CHOICE Act to make it more appealing to the entire GOP, moderate Senate Democrats and President-elect Donald Trump. Trump's desired changes to Dodd-Frank echo measures in the bill, but Trump has not endorsed this replacement.

Full Story:
Morning Consult
12/8/2016

The Securities and Exchange Commission declined to provide details on a $3.5 million whistleblower settlement, aside from commenting that the matter involved a securities violation. Whistleblowers can receive up to 30% of penalties that exceed $1 million, and the program has awarded $135 million since 2012.