Leadership
Top editor picks, summarized for you
5/2/2016

Coaching only works if you keep things simple and specific, says John Baldoni. Flash cards are a useful way to do that, as simmering advice down to short phrases forces you to focus on clear, actionable guidance.

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John Baldoni
5/2/2016

Two years ago, TNT basketball sideline reporter Craig Sager was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and given no more than six months to live. Today, he continues to work a full schedule despite a grueling regimen of travel, treatments and recurrences, and the league has rallied around him. "A patient who battles this past a year is amazing," says Sager's doctor, Naveen Pemmaraju. "What he's done is almost miraculous."

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Craig Sager, basketball
5/2/2016

Radiohead is one of the most respected bands in the world and also one of the most business-savvy. Band members have founded at least 20 companies to handle everything from ticket sales to T-shirt distribution, with individual albums usually getting their own corporate imprint. "[I]f you want to be a great band, it can help if you are as good at finance as you are at music, or at least have a team supporting you who are," writes Alex Marshall.

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The Guardian (London)
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Radiohead
5/2/2016

Success is easier when you live in the present, says Vivian Lee, CEO of University of Utah Health Care. "I think people are often so worried about the next step, and the next step after that, that they're not focused on where they are now," Lee says.

5/2/2016

Many bosses don't want team members to reply to their off-hours emails, but employees will read and reply anyway unless expectations are made clear, writes Scott Eblin. That's a recipe for a preventable epidemic of workplace stress and burnout, Eblin writes. "We're operating under a mass delusion, and it's making us miserable," he argues.

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Fast Company online
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Scott Eblin
5/2/2016

People increasingly communicate, mostly electronically, with coworkers from different countries and cultures, and all of that makes miscommunication and incorrect perceptions more likely, says Bhaskar Pant. Companies should help employees with cross-cultural training to help them step back and look for other perspectives, Pant says.

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CIO.com
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Bhaskar Pant
5/2/2016

Leaders are prone to becoming isolated, but the solution is simple: Start walking around and talking to employees, writes John Keyser. In doing so, show you want their ideas and feedback. "This is how we open the door to trust and solid, productive working relationships," he writes.

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John Keyser
5/2/2016

Communication skills are a vital adjunct to an employee's other capabilities, especially for those looking to climb the career ladder, Arne Sorenson, president and CEO of Marriott International, said in a recent interview. "If you're a master at running a spreadsheet or a financial model, but really don't have the ability to understand the assumptions that are in it, or debate the assumptions in it, then you're not going to go as far as you could go otherwise," he says.

4/29/2016

ZoomInfo CEO Yonatan Stern founded his company in Massachusetts but later moved to Israel. The separation from his team taught him to delegate and empower, as well as the folly of needless risk. "Just because your company is successful doesn't mean you have a license to take unnecessary risks. Risk-taking is overrated and costly," he writes.

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ZoomInfo, Yonatan Stern
4/29/2016

Comcast is buying DreamWorks Animation for $3.8 billion, ending CEO Jeffrey Katzenberg's more than two-decade independent Hollywood revolt that started after Disney fired him. The sale is surprising if only because Katzenberg is voluntarily giving up control. As Nicole LaPorte writes of DreamWorks, "Over the years, in good times and in bad -- and for better or for worse -- no one has been more dedicated to building it, cultivating it, and protecting it than Katzenberg."