Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/24/2017

Disrupting a business model means change, and managing such change can't be done in the same disruptive manner, writes Alaina Love. Such leaders need to instead be transformational, building "a culture that embraces change, engages with ambiguity and relinquishes the fear that naturally accompanies change so that the organization can ultimately innovate."

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Alaina Love
1/24/2017

Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter says one of the most important aspects of leaders is how they conduct themselves in front of subordinates. "If they don't see an example in my commitment to the mission and the way I conduct myself, it will be hard for them to follow me as a leader," he says.

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Ashton B. Carter
1/24/2017

Bad management styles persist because most managers aren't trained properly, not enough people care and companies still generally make money, writes Ted Bauer. "If you try to make decisions about management without considering the psychology of the execs or the potential incentive structure, it won't go anywhere," he argues.

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The Context of Things
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Ted Bauer
1/24/2017

Not every acquisition is the same, and the circumstances of an individual deal will require an individual approach, according to this McKinsey analysis. Consider changing your M&A approach when two companies' cultures differ significantly, when the target's core business is not the same as yours, and when the target company is bigger than yours.

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McKinsey
1/24/2017

Yielding in conversations is similar to yielding in driving, Ed Batista writes, in that both parties need to slow down and assess the situation before deciding who gets to move first. "After we've recognized the potential for conflict, and slowed down enough to engage the other party, we need to look for opportunities to achieve our goals for the conversation," he writes.

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Ed Batista blog
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Ed Batista
1/24/2017

The 20th century brought unparalleled advances in medicine and surgery that were easy to see, whereas it's tougher for humans to rationalize time and money spent on the incremental benefits primary-care visits provide, writes Dr. Atul Gawande. This less exciting but important path to progress can be seen in other areas of our society, such as bridge maintenance versus new construction.

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Dr. Atul Gawande
1/24/2017

The Year of the Rooster is fast approaching, and Chinese families are engaging with "traditions leading up to and during the new year to help usher in good luck and fortune," writes Echo Huang. Such traditions include cleaning house, buying certain types of plants, giving gifts in red envelopes and preparing large meals.

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Quartz
1/24/2017

Performers at Spanish-language network Telemundo may vote on whether to join the SAG-AFTRA union, the National Labor Relations Board says. The union last year accused Telemundo, which is owned by NBCUniversal, of treating its Spanish-speaking performers like "second-class citizens."

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Deadline.com
1/24/2017

The US Supreme Court will not take up a lower court's decision that struck down a Texas law requiring voters to present certain kinds of photo identification. The US Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit ruled that the law, which did not allow items such as welfare benefit cards or state university IDs as proof of voter eligibility, discriminated against minority voters.

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Reuters
1/23/2017

To be successful, leaders have to try and let go of self-doubt and be unafraid of making mistakes, John Baldoni says in this blog post and video. "Great leaders are those who leverage failure to achieve success," he says.

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John Baldoni