Leadership
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/27/2016

Starting Sept. 1, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz and another executive will focus their efforts on growing Starbucks' small, premium offerings, such as Roasteries coffee shops and Reserve Stores. The move leaves Starbucks coffee shops at the core but emphasizes how there may be less new growth there than in premium offerings.

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Starbucks, Howard Schultz
7/27/2016

Sometimes the best of intentions wind up failing leaders, Kevin Kruse writes. Rules written too broadly can restrict employees, target the few at the expense of the many, and proscribe behaviors instead of goals.

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Forbes
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Kevin Kruse
7/27/2016

The secret to top-ranked companies is flexible and meaningful work that sits within a larger community, writes S. Chris Edmonds. "[H]appy employees benefit from innovative approaches to support life outside of the workplace, like flexible scheduling, supportive and cooperative colleagues and leaders," and more, he writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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S. Chris Edmonds
7/27/2016

Raquel Whiting Gilmer views her job as incoming executive director of organization OrchKids as instilling hope and providing opportunity, especially for children in difficult situations. "When I think about my life, I think about having that foundation from my mom and understanding that I could do anything I wanted," she says.

7/27/2016

Ball lightning, nature's oddest form of lightning, has long been a mystery because of its seemingly many origins and the difficulty of predicting and observing the phenomenon. A scientist now says that bubbles of microwaves are the likely source, though more research is needed.

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Nautilus
7/27/2016

Social media can help speakers connect before, during and after important public speaking opportunities, but you need to give an incentive, Jim Anderson writes. "The #1 thing that I think that you have to offer to them is going to be access to yourself," he writes.

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Jim Anderson, social media
7/27/2016

Disney is a well-known example of a customer–driven corporate culture, and two components of such a culture are knowing your story and having clear guidelines, Bill Capodagli writes. "Codes of conduct give a general direction regarding how to behave, but enable employees to use their common sense to perform in their roles," he writes.

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TanveerNaseer.com
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Disney, Bill Capodagli
7/27/2016

Preemptive social media outreach to customers, answering requests with video and looking for opportunities to surprise customers are among 10 steps for transitioning from traditional customer service to social media–based service.

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Forbes
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social media
7/26/2016

Marie Kondo's "The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up" involves a lot of rules, as Stephanie Vozza discovered. "Tedious is an understatement, and according to Kondo's rules, you can't do the process while watching television or even listening to music," Vozza writes.

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Fast Company online
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Marie Kondo, Stephanie Vozza
7/26/2016

Since the death of her husband, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg has publicly expressed her grief and rethought some of the advice she offered in the 2013 book "Lean In." In a Mother's Day post, Sandberg acknowledged that the book had not adequately addressed the challenges facing working parents who have "an unsupportive partner, or no partner at all."

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Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook