Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/21/2017

People viewed as overly happy are also seen as uninformed and easier to exploit, Maurice Schweitzer says based on his research. "The baseline is some happiness, but when people go above that, when they're expressing it on their faces, the reaction they get is totally different from just sort of regular happiness or the normal ups and down that we have during the day," he says.

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Knowledge@Wharton
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Maurice Schweitzer
2/21/2017

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's lengthy statement last week signals he views his company as not just a business but as a creator of global "social infrastructure," a term he uses frequently but does not define. "Zuckerberg's manifesto ... is compromised by the undefined jargon, the unacknowledged conflicts, and the uncritical optimism about Facebook's ability to meet the needs and desires of all of its users at once," Will Oremus argues.

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Backchannel, Slate, TechCrunch
2/21/2017

Disagreements are inevitable, but how we approach those conflicts is what matters, writes Joel Garfinkle. He offers seven tips to avoid arguments, including making an effort to find points of agreement, asking questions, and keeping a positive facial expression and tone of voice.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Joel Garfinkle
2/21/2017

Managers who can help employees feel as though they are equals are more likely to see creativity, trust, smart decisions and, ultimately, desired results, writes Mary Jo Asmus. Rising to leadership simply means "you have a responsibility to help people grow and develop, to contribute their ideas and to feel free to say what they are thinking," she argues.

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Aspire-CS.com
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Mary Jo Asmus
2/21/2017

Companies are finding it more difficult to stay silent on political issues, writes Leslie Gaines-Ross of Weber Shandwick, whose research suggests that a near-majority of executives at large companies believes leadership should speak up on public policy concerns. Gaines-Ross suggests CEOs come up with a narrative "that connects the issue to their employees' and customers' everyday lives."

2/21/2017

Innovation is the only way businesses can grow beyond their natural limits, writes Valeria Maltoni. Such innovation can be driven by fear, curiosity, the pursuit of wealth, a desire to create a legacy, or a combination of the four factors.

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Conversation Agent
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Valeria Maltoni
2/21/2017

Valerie Smith, president of Swarthmore College, says that no matter how much leaders think they know about a situation, it is critically important for them to listen before leading. "I would see people getting in their own way and realize there was a different way to do this -- that it would be useful to ask questions rather than just tell people what I thought at the outset," she says.

2/21/2017

Parks and recreation officials and naturalists are divided in how they view "desire lines," or the informal paths caused by people repeatedly walking through an area not formally marked. In New York City, parks officials and the Natural Areas Conservancy have created a digital map of unofficial trails to help understand why they are being formed.

2/21/2017

The Supreme Court soon will take up the issue of class-action waivers at workplaces. Decisions in two recent California cases found that class-action waivers as part of employment contracts were legally unenforceable.

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US Supreme Court
2/21/2017

A 119-million pound uranium deposit in Virginia that's believed to be the largest in the US will remain untapped. The US Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit has thrown out a lawsuit that sought to overturn the state's uranium mining ban, which went into effect in the 1980s.