Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
10/20/2017

Discover what personal and creative strengths are unique to you, and use those to find your role in the workplace, writes Scott Mautz. He notes the story of filmmaker Nora Ephron, who used her writing and directing platform to send powerful messages and mentor other women.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Nora Ephron, Scott Mautz
10/20/2017

Not everyone can feel a deep sense of purpose at work, so focus more on doing something you love and quitting when that's not the case, writes Ted Kinni. "[D]o not sacrifice your happiness or your freedom or your very limited time on this planet to give Mark Zuckerberg or any other sense-of-purpose-spouting mogul another billion bucks," he writes.

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NewCo Shift
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Mark Zuckerberg
10/20/2017

Companies facing competition or other threats often look to grab control when they need to take a chance on the talents and insights of their employees, customers and partners, says Amanda Setili. "If you want to grow, you should consider all the ways that you might be able to create something entirely new by partnering with other organizations and individuals that can bring something to the table that you don't have," argues Setili.

10/20/2017

Smiling too much, not matching gestures to speech, pausing too often and ill-timed facial expressions are ways your audience perceives your authenticity, writes Anett Grant. It's important to note that doing these things doesn't make you inauthentic -- only that your audience could think that.

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Fast Company online
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Anett Grant
10/20/2017

We need to pay attention to those who aren't afraid to speak up, even if others are critical of them, writes Seth Godin. "Perhaps, if we listen a bit harder, we'll be able to do the right thing that much sooner," Godin argues.

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Seth Godin's Blog
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Seth Godin
10/20/2017

Personalities are not rigid and narrow, and we can act differently through the use of meaningful and deliberate projects, says researcher and author Brian Little. "The sustainable pursuit of core projects in our lives is the hallmark of human flourishing," he argues.

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New York magazine
10/20/2017

Saddleback Leather founder Dave Munson tells the story of how he inadvertently became a founder after designing a simple leather bag for himself that drew so much attention that he began selling bags. He also shares how, after a couple of years away from the business, he had to regain the trust and respect of the people he'd left behind.

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Forbes
10/20/2017

There may be similarities between human and fish depression, with scientists suggesting the study of fish could help develop antidepressants, writes Heather Murphy. Just like humans, when zebrafish become depressed, they lose interest in eating and their surroundings.

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Heather Murphy
10/20/2017

When it comes to work-life balance, there's no one size that fits all. You may be happier when you come to terms with the fact that you prefer juggling your roles throughout the day or blending your work activities with the rest of your life, writes Andy Molinsky.

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Psychology Today
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Andy Molinsky
10/20/2017

Major tech companies are among those forming a coalition to push for legislation that would give young people brought to the US illegally as children a way to become permanent residents. Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Intel and Uber are among the companies listed as members in documents drafted to form the coalition.

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Reuters