Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/27/2017

No one is perfect, and failure or frustration can be demoralizing even for CEOs, Daniel Doucette writes. CEOs can fight through these feelings by thinking about storytelling in terms of their internal story and the ones they tell confidants, mentees and the public.

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BraveShift
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Daniel Doucette
7/27/2017

Lower-level employees can provide unique insight into customers' needs and how new strategies are executed, writes Skot Carruth of Philosophie. Consider "trickle-up" innovation, which involves cross-functional staffing and experimenting with new ideas.

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Switch & Shift blog
7/27/2017

Much of the focus on automation has been on manufacturing and manual labor, but there's reason to think white-collar management jobs can be displaced by algorithms -- and quickly, writes Mark Mills. "Consider a bellwether of more white-collar disruption yet to come: of the nearly 200 so-called Unicorns -- private, venture-backed companies such as Uber that are valued over $1 billion -- 90 percent are in nonmanufacturing businesses," he writes.

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City Journal online
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Mark Mills
7/27/2017

Productivity growth in recent years has been far less than during the preceding post-World War II decades, and one challenge in addressing this problem is determining whether productivity is a result or cause of poor economic growth, Neil Irwin writes. One idea is that companies are not investing enough capital in things that will spur growth.

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Neil Irwin
7/27/2017

EverQuote co-founder and CEO Seth Birnbaum learned quickly that being a CEO means grappling with people issues -- more than he expected. He's tried to focus on "transparency based on individual ownership" that looks beyond experience or age to focus on what people bring to the table.

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The American CEO
7/27/2017

During World War I, crafty Americans used their knitting needles to raise funds and provide clothing for the Allied forces. Between 1917 and 1919, patriotic knitters produced roughly 370 million knit items, according to the American Red Cross.

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Atlas Obscura
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World War, American Red Cross
7/27/2017

Leaders develop themselves but must also help teams achieve more -- and watching a great leader in action can be mesmerizing and inspiring, writes Mark Miller. The effort required to mold a great team is tremendous but so are the potential returns, he argues.

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Great Leadership
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Mark Miller
7/27/2017

The Department of Labor has invited public comment on a rule proposed by the Obama administration to extend mandatory overtime pay to workers earning a basic salary of $47,000 from the current maximum threshold of $23,660. The call is seen as the first step in a move by the Trump administration to block or significantly amend the rule, which has been criticized by industry bodies.

7/27/2017

William Rowe is the new chief risk officer for the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Rowe, who has been with the OCC since 1992, will direct the agency's enterprise risk committee, as well as its Office of Enterprise Risk Management.

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Compliance Week
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OCC
7/27/2017

The Durbin Amendment's price caps are part of the reason only 30% of consumers have free checking accounts, a Federal Reserve report says. The report's authors estimate that if not for the provision, almost two-thirds of consumers would have access to free checking accounts.

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The Hill
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Federal Reserve