Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/23/2017

Leading a group of individuals with diverse preferences and personalities requires emotional intelligence, Kat Boogaard writes. Be sensitive to what your direct reports are going through outside of work, and seek to advocate on their behalf within your organization.

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The Muse
8/22/2017

Professionals can make better use of their available time simply by planning schedules in complete weeks instead of individual days, says author Laura Vanderkam. Planning ahead allows you to front-load important tasks to ensure they get done and budget time for things that come up unexpectedly.

8/22/2017

If you don't get the salary you want after negotiating with your boss, be professional about it but start working on how you can do better in the next negotiation, writes Joel Garfinkle. Find out where you need to improve yourself, and make sure you're aware of the market rate for your position, Garfinkle writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Joel Garfinkle
8/22/2017

Corporate leaders have traditionally stayed out of political and social strife unless absolutely necessary, but recent years have seen an increase in corporate activism, including among CEOs. These corporations are generally taking stands that favor diversity, but there's also risk in angering a part of the customer base, writes David Gelles.

8/22/2017

Failure and negative feedback can help you find out whether your communication is ineffective and how to improve, writes John Brandon. Try overcommunicating to ensure that employees understand you and don't wait too long to ask for clarification.

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Inc. online
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John Brandon
8/22/2017

Consider a team effort the next time you need to work on strategy or vision, writes Jesse Lyn Stoner. Set aside time for brainstorming, and ask questions rather than try to sell your own ideas.

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Seapoint Center
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Jesse Lyn Stoner
8/22/2017

Dismissing wacky ideas during brainstorming meetings can discourage wide-ranging thinking from everyone else, writes George Barbee. Avoid this by writing the idea down, showing respect for it and experimenting with the idea.

8/22/2017

Dan Schulman has taken three companies public and now serves as the CEO of PayPal. He says the martial art form krav maga has taught him two key things: to use avoidance and de-escalation in tense situations and to never stand still.

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Business Insider
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Krav Maga, Dan Schulman, PayPal
8/22/2017

What separates soft serve from regular ice cream is the stage at which it is served, with soft serve being ready to eat after air is whipped into a frozen dairy mixture, writes Kat Eschner. Soft serve is mostly made up of air and sits at about 21 degrees Fahrenheit, while normal ice cream is less than 30% air and is served at around 10 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Smithsonian online
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Kat Eschner
8/22/2017

Companies whose job candidates or employees fail drug tests are constrained by different laws depending on their state, industry and company policies, lawyers say. Federal laws apply in some industries and jobs, but drug-related policies for most private companies are subject to state laws, with additional complicating factors when medical marijuana or prescription drugs are involved.

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marijuana