Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/19/2018

A National Labor Relations Board attorney says Google did not violate labor law in firing software engineer James Damore after he sent a memo to colleagues stating women were not as fit for coding jobs as men. Damore is seeking class-action status for a lawsuit he filed against Google claiming the company discriminates against white, male and conservative employees.

2/19/2018

A new law in California bars employers from asking job applicants about their previous compensation, and similar laws are going into effect in several other states. "This means employers may need to enact significantly new internal hiring and interviewing policies -- and enforce them," writes Kelly Kinnard of Battery Ventures.

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Battery Ventures
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Battery Ventures
2/19/2018

The Supreme Court could announce Tuesday whether it will hear the Trump administration's appeal of a decision blocking a plan to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The justices discussed the matter Friday.

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Reuters
2/16/2018

T-Mobile's revenue has more than doubled since John Legere become CEO in 2012, with a focus on customer needs a key factor, writes Aaron Pressman. "Reps are held responsible for the outcomes of their customer group, measured by metrics such as how frequently customers defect to another carrier or how often they call support, and reps and their managers are empowered to hand out service credits or alter bills," he writes.

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Fortune
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T-Mobile, John Legere
2/16/2018

Cross-cultural training is important for anyone who visits other countries or receives visitors from abroad, writes training expert Donna Steffey. "Utilizing awareness-in-action is also required -- the ability to read people around you and to know when it is necessary to self-correct or make amends for your mistake," she writes.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
2/16/2018

Speakers lose their charm when they are bogged down by too much detail, which can be because they're trying to show off or going too far into specifics for the audience, writes Anett Grant. "If someone asks, 'Could you give me an update on that project?' that's not an invitation to go through your work step by step," she writes.

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Fast Company online
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Anett Grant
2/16/2018

Every work culture has its pros and cons, so if yours is experiencing too much stress from competitiveness, it may be time to borrow concepts from a collaborative culture, writes Jesse Lyn Stoner. When red tape and dullness inhibit performance in a bureaucratic workplace, adopt approaches from startups, such as allowing more individual initiative, she writes.

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Seapoint Center
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Jesse Lyn Stoner
2/16/2018

The CEO must set a data-driven, bold benchmark for strategy sessions to avoid them becoming a battle over each department's interests, write Chris Bradley, Martin Hirt and Sven Smit. They recommend replacing annual strategy meetings with an ongoing discussion that focuses on a few key bets rather than diluting resources through many projects.

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McKinsey
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Sven Smit, Martin Hirt, Chris Bradley
2/16/2018

Our brains need to be persuaded that new behaviors are safe, so practice daily for at least two months to develop a habit and avoid backsliding, writes Marcia Reynolds. "Asking for support and assistance can make you feel vulnerable, yet social support is important to help you override the emotions that can trigger your brain to give up your plans," she writes.

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Psychology Today
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Marcia Reynolds
2/16/2018

Frederic Laluyaux, CEO of Aera Technology, says some of his best decisions resulted from taking a chance on people. "Someone that doesn't have the necessary pedigree on paper, but has the grit, the talent, the energy, the intelligence, and you give those folks a chance to move up very fast and take more responsibility, you get rewarded so much with that," he says.

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Enterprise Times (UK)