Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/20/2017

Coolhaus CEO Natasha Case began her ice cream business on a foundation of architectural principles, seeking to go beyond the usual expectations for ice cream. "Get a minimum viable product going and then always keep innovating and improving what you're working on," she said.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
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Natasha Case
9/20/2017

Cheesecake Factory, Chili's Grill & Bar and other casual-dining chains are seeing sales declines, with fast-casual, takeout and independent restaurants favored by consumers as Americans continue to spend on food outside the home. Chili's and Applebee's are trying to go back to basics in their menus and brand to win back customers.

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Chili, Applebee
9/20/2017

Resiliency and loyalty are important to a career, so midlevel leaders should only leave if the organization clearly no longer values them or if an offer is too good to turn down, says Mark Crowley. Camille Fournier urges leaders to develop succession plans and as long a notice period as possible, or else "there is no way to leave without causing disruption."

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Lighthouse
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Mark Crowley
9/20/2017

Talking to someone about issues you have with them can be difficult, but avoidance stalls real problem-solving, writes Dan Oestreich. Instead, think about how you can approach these conflicts with compassion and honesty as a way to connect rather than resorting to judgment.

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Unfolding Leadership
9/20/2017

Leaders must work to create an environment where respectful disagreement takes place, writes John Manning. They can lead by example through avoiding defensiveness and acknowledging differing opinions in a way that values all contributions.

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The MAP Blog
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John Manning
9/20/2017

When people call customer service, they are often looking for sympathy and understanding, as well as a solution to their problem, writes April Glaser. A 2015 survey showed nearly all callers hope to talk to a human, so automated systems run the risk of angering customers, who then take that out on employees.

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Slate
9/20/2017

Therese Tucker used her retirement savings to start a business that has become BlackLine, a publicly traded company aimed at serving companies with more than $50 million annual revenue. "A lot of product founders don't make the transition to being the CEO of a bigger company, but Therese has a knack for figuring out when she needs to drill down and when she needs to run with things," says Hollie Moore Haynes, a BlackLine board member and early investor.

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Inc.
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Therese Tucker, BlackLine, drill down
9/20/2017

"Sriracha," "froyo" and "pregame" have made it into the more than 250 new words recently added by Merriam-Webster. Political language also made the list in the form of "troll," "dog whistle" and other terms.

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USA Today, TIME online
9/20/2017

Shareholders of Dutch phone company Veon, formerly known as VimpelCom, may pursue "in large part" proposed class-action claims that the company inflated its share price and concealed a bribery scheme in Uzbekistan, a US judge has ruled. The company admitted last year that it had made bribery payments of more than $114 million to an Uzbek official, and it agreed to pay $795 million in penalties to settle US and Dutch investigations.

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Reuters
9/20/2017

Minnesota construction company JL Schwieters will pay $125,000 to settle a racial harassment case brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The EEOC said two employees were subject to derogatory slurs by a manager who also made a makeshift noose out of electrical wire and threatened to hang the workers.

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Legal Newsline