Leadership
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/30/2015

Fitbit CEO James Park released data from his company's devices to show how his body reacted leading up to Fitbit's initial public offering. His heart rate was generally steady, with occasional spikes due to things like tough analyst questions. "A lot of times you welcome it because good, tough questions also force us to think more clearly about the business," he says.

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Fortune
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CEO, James Park, Fitbit
7/30/2015

Yelp, the publicly traded customer-review site, is seeing employees poached by venture capital-backed startups that can outbid the struggling company. Investors are unhappy the company missed revenue and hiring targets, and Yelp is phasing out national advertising because such ads don't work on its mobile app. The solution for Yelp may simply be to find a buyer, analysts say.

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Re/code, Bloomberg, Reuters
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Yelp
7/30/2015

Presentation skills can be used to improve your executive presence, writes Stephanie Scotti, who offers advice on using them to your advantage. "I've observed that if you develop one area, then everything recalibrates and all your skills go up a notch. So don't try to do everything at once," she writes.

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Stephanie Scotti
7/30/2015

Good leaders set smart goals for their workers, writes Andre Lavoie, CEO of ClearCompany. That means having a transparent and flexible goal-setting process, and finding ways to link goals to broader company priorities and to the employee's need for growth and development.

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Andre Lavoie
7/30/2015

Economic uncertainty underscores a need to raise the U.S. debt limit, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew says in a letter to Congress. The government can probably meet financial obligations until Oct. 30 by continuing "extraordinary measures" implemented in March, Lew says.

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USA Today
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Jack Lew, Congress
7/30/2015

Dan Ott is one of northeastern Ohio's most notorious car thieves, with multiple prison stints during decades of criminal activity. His stories include stealing a cow on a whim and claiming to have stolen Elizabeth Taylor's car -- and her dog. But Ott is able to brag about his crimes, in part, because a hit man in 2006 killed an innocent man with the same name who also lived in Ohio.

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Cleveland Scene
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Dan Ott, Elizabeth Taylor
7/30/2015

Financial regulations and low interest rates have combined to chill the opening of new banks in recent years. In the past, officials issued an average of about 100 charters a year for new financial institutions. Since 2010, just three have opened.

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CNN
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interest rates
7/30/2015

Good leadership begins when you face your fears and those of your employees, writes Dan Rockwell. The key is to distinguish between cowardice, which must be overcome, and reasoned resistance, which must be engaged with and navigated beyond. "Fearful leaders say, 'It seems like a good idea,' but won't commit," he writes.

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Leadership Freak blog
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Dan Rockwell
7/30/2015

The congressional battle over highway funding could be averted by raising the federal gas tax, which hasn't changed in more than 20 years, writes James Surowiecki. "It's a user tax: if you don't drive you don't pay it, and if you drive less it costs you less. It helps to correct, at least mildly, a clear market failure: people who drive don't pay the full costs of the externalities they create," he argues.

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gas tax, James Surowiecki
7/30/2015

The electricity business used to be based around regional monopolies, but the rise of low-carbon, decentralized generation is shaking up the industry, and demanding new strategies from producers and industrial-scale buyers of energy. "The potential for further disruption is immense -- but so are the opportunities," write Norbert Schwieters and Tom Flaherty.

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