Policy & Advocacy
Top editor picks, summarized for you
6/30/2015

An excerpt from Sen. Ted Cruz's memoir shares gossip from his days as a clerk at the Supreme Court, including a description of justices' lunch habits and one's alleged tendency to speak loudly in public about pending cases. He also recalls an Internet-tutorial session that brought up images that caused then Justice Sandra Day O'Connor to lower her head and simply say, "Oh, my."

6/30/2015

The White House is set to begin releasing details of its plan to expand overtime eligibility for American workers, with as many as 5 million people expected to see salary increases as soon as next year. The salary ceiling for overtime pay would increase from $23,660 to $50,400 a year and be tied to the 40th percentile of income. Such a change has generated opposition among Republicans and business groups.

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Obama, White House
6/30/2015

Domestic partner benefits could be at risk of being eliminated or severely changed following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on marriage equality. With marriage legal for all workers, surveys indicate that more than one-fifth of large employers could drop health care coverage for unmarried workers' domestic partners of either sex.

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U.S. Supreme Court
6/30/2015

Nonprofits can improve their marketing, build important relationships and raise more money by operating like small businesses. "Many aspects of a non-profit organization can translate to a small business counterpart," said CURE Childhood Cancer Executive Director Kristin Connor. "That is how we handle our financial goals, patient and family services objectives, employee, donor and volunteer relations and our research investments."

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cure
6/30/2015

Colleges are increasingly taking their fundraising campaigns to Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and crowdfunding sites. Crowdfunding campaigns that focus on a specific subject or cause are the most effective, according to USEED co-founder Matt Racz. Experts agree that donors are more likely to give when they know how their money will make a difference.

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Facebook, social media, Twitter, Instagram
6/30/2015

Bullitt, Ford, William and Flora Hewlett, Kresge and Wilburforce foundations and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund are urging other environmental nonprofits to share racial and gender data on their boards and staff. All six groups have shared their diversity data with GuideStar, and are calling for greater diversity among environmental groups. In 2014, minorities held less than 5% of board leadership positions at environmental nonprofits, according to Green 2.0.

6/30/2015

Peter and Nancy Meinig and their daughters have given a charitable gift of $50 million to Cornell University's School of Biomedical Engineering. The school will be renamed Nancy E. and Peter C. Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering in their honor. The gift "sets us on a course for increased impact in biomedical engineering and the convergent biosciences, an interdisciplinary effort that will drive advances in health and well-being over the next decades," said President-elect Elizabeth Garrett.

6/30/2015

The Old Red Museum in Dallas has been struggling to generate revenue and it has about $2 million in debt. Board member David Biegler is calling on the museum to do more marketing to bring in private donations and additional visitors. Biegler added that the museum should try to draw at least 100,000 visitors annually.

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Texas museum
6/30/2015

Engineers, technologists and other tech leaders who once identified with hacker culture are well suited for philanthropy, writes Napster co-founder and former Facebook President Sean Parker. Having a tangible effect is important for hackers, and something that can be difficult for philanthropists to measure. "It's important for hackers to embrace the values that made them successful in the first place: skepticism of the establishment and a desire to provoke or upend it," he writes.

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Sean Parker, Facebook, Napster
6/30/2015

On Friday, President Barack Obama gave a moving speech in support of the Supreme Court's ruling that legalized marriage equality nationwide. Obama called the ruling "a victory for America" and added that it "reaffirmed that all Americans are entitled to equal protection to the law; that all people are treated equally regardless of who they are or who they love. ... [T]oday, we can say in no uncertain terms that we've made our union a little more perfect."

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Barack Obama, Supreme Court

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