Policy & Advocacy
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/2/2015

Developers in Chicago are building more downtown residential units with three and four bedrooms, and that's encouraging more families to wait longer before moving to the suburbs, says Colin Hebson, real estate agent with Dream Town Realty. Downtown homes are more affordable in Chicago than in other large U.S. cities such as New York and Washington, D.C.

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CNBC
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real estate agent
7/2/2015

The Supreme Court may have legalized same-sex marriage, but discrimination against gay people by employers and businesses remains legal and largely unrestricted in 31 states. That's despite polling suggesting that more than 75% of people believe such discrimination should be illegal.

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Vox
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same-sex marriage, Supreme Court
7/2/2015

Hillary Clinton raised an average of more than $500,000 per day during her campaign's first quarter, for a total of $45 million -- expected to be the largest amount ever raised by a primary candidate during the first quarter. Some 91% of those donations were in amounts of $100 or less, an indicator of the campaign's long-term fundraising potential, according to reports.

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Hillary Clinton
7/2/2015

Donald Trump's politically incorrect pronouncements about the criminality of Mexican immigrants have propelled him to second place in Republican primary polling -- and Democrats couldn't be happier. Trump's ascendancy could make it harder for other GOP candidates to win over minority voters, analysts say. "I am a person of faith -- and the Donald's entry into this race can only be attributed to the fact that the good Lord is a Democrat with a sense of humor," says Democratic strategist Paul Begala.

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Donald Trump, GOP, Paul Begala
7/2/2015

Michelle Obama on Wednesday literally tore up signs that ban photography during White House tours, as the First Family announced new policies encouraging tourist snapshots and asking people to share their photos online. The move could improve the Obamas' standing with young people, said presidential historian Robert Dallek. "They don't do these things without political considerations," he added.

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Michelle Obama, Obamas
7/2/2015

Research from the Urban Institute shows how neighborhoods with concentrations of affluent residents remained fixed between 1990 and 2010, while neighborhoods that are home to poorer residents shifted, expanded and fell further into poverty. Zoning policies in wealthy suburbs have kept affordable housing out and have resulted in concentrated areas of advantage, the report says.

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CityLab
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Urban Institute
7/2/2015

Across the economic spectrum, whites tend to live in higher-income neighborhoods relative to blacks and Hispanics, according to a Stanford Graduate School of Education study. For example, a black household earning $50,000 annually on average lives in a neighborhood with median income below $43,000, while a white household with the same annual income lives in a neighborhood where median income is nearly $53,000. The patterns of segregation have long-term consequences, researchers say.

7/2/2015

New York lawmakers have outlawed controversial "poor doors," or entrances in luxury buildings that are designated for lower-income renters. The ban applies to new construction funded under the state's 421-a tax break program.

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CNNMoney
7/2/2015

Exposure to lead, which can cause developmental and behavioral problems in children, is a threat to residents of Los Angeles' Promise Zone, which includes 13 of the city's poorest neighborhoods. City health officials plan to ramp up testing in those neighborhoods, where they suspect a lack of access to health care is skewing reported rates of lead poisoning. They are also educating contractors about the risks.

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KPCC-FM (Los Angeles)
7/2/2015

Local, state and federal governments should take note of last week's Supreme Court ruling on housing discrimination and stop spending money in ways that promote racial segregation, writes The New York Times in an editorial. "[I]t is a misrepresentation to describe new housing alone as 'revitalization' in the absence of things like good schools and job opportunities that make for vibrant, economically healthy communities," the paper writes.

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