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12/14/2017

Student portfolios should not be a catalog of what students learn, but rather, portfolios should help students make connections to content and overall learning goals, writes Beth Holland, Johns Hopkins University doctoral candidate and EdTechTeacher instructor. In this blog post, she suggests looking beyond tools used to save, share and publish student work, and instead focus on teaching the "art of reflection."

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Edutopia online
12/14/2017

The outage that affected Google Chromebook devices earlier this month was a wake-up call, some educators say. Kelly Dumont, an education technologist in a Utah school district where about 20,000 devices were affected, says the glitch was "temporarily catastrophic," and that he and others worry it could mean the potential for more issues.

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EdSurge
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Google, Chromebook
12/14/2017

A tentative deal on a compromise congressional tax bill package is not expected to include a measure that would have categorized graduate school tuition waivers as taxable income. The provision was originally included in the House version of the bill, but was not included in the Senate version.

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Senate, the House
12/14/2017

Working alone in classrooms has been professionally lonesome, writes Georgia English-language arts teacher Farhat Ahmad. In this commentary, Ahmad writes about the experience of having other educators show interest in his practice after he received an award and what he learned about finding a "tribe" as a teacher.

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EdSurge
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Farhat Ahmad
12/14/2017

A book "tasting" encourages students to read books for just three minutes and then discuss their opinions with peers, writes fifth-grade English-language arts teacher Emma Tackett. In this blog post, Tackett describes the process of presenting four books of varied genres to groups of four students, who will read each book and share their thoughts.

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Edutopia online
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3-minute, Emma Tackett
12/14/2017

More than a dozen languages spoken in villages in Tibet are at risk of disappearing, according to a recent presentation by Gerald Roche, an anthropologist at the University of Melbourne. State schooling and growth of the internet are among the reasons given for why the languages are at risk, as well as that fewer parents are teaching the minority languages to their children, who are learning Tibetan.

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Smithsonian online
12/14/2017

A yearslong effort to boost outcomes for Latino students in a California county is paying off. Efforts in Riverside County include a data-sharing agreement among its 23 school districts, which helped leaders there identify common obstacles to achievement.

12/14/2017

Research shows that despite some gains, students from disadvantaged groups experience fewer positive outcomes than their peers, asserts Verletta White, interim superintendent of Baltimore County Public Schools in Maryland. In this commentary, she highlights how the creation of an Office of Equity and Cultural Proficiency -- and other steps -- have helped educators focus on the needs of all students in the school district.

12/14/2017

A school district in Florida welcomed training from a group called Sandy Hook Promise. The group uses initiatives such as Start With Hello, which encourages interaction among students, and Say Something, in which students are encouraged to tell an adult about potential concerns.

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PBS
12/14/2017

Smoke caused by wildfires in Southern California can lead to health problems, and vulnerable populations such as homeless people and farmworkers may be especially at risk. Wildfire seasons have been getting longer in the West, and geographer John Abatzoglou noted that warm conditions can "accelerate the rate at which vegetation dries up and becomes receptive to igniting and carrying fire."

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Pacific Magazine
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John Abatzoglou