EdTech
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12/8/2017

Making last-minute decisions may be more complicated than previously known, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Researchers believe the findings can help them better understand and resolve issues of addictive behavior.

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Johns Hopkins University
12/7/2017

School districts can eliminate potential conflicts of interest by requiring leaders to disclose when they are paid to attend technology events, says Rob Reich, director of the Center for Ethics in Society at Stanford University. Such leaders should recuse themselves from decisions concerning the purchase of technology from companies that compensated them, Reich recommends.

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EdSurge
12/7/2017

High-school senior Faith Florez created the app Calor, which can notify farmworkers when temperatures are dangerously high, provide tips for staying cool and connect to first responders in an emergency. The app was developed with help from students at the University of Southern California's Viterbi School of Engineering, and it's currently being crowdfunded.

12/7/2017

Kindergarten students at one Wyoming elementary school are using the game "Kodable" to learn basic computer science concepts by helping a fuzzy blue alien find his way home. The lesson was part of the school's Hour of Code program.

12/6/2017

Jessica Ladd, a survivor of sexual assault in college who says she was then traumatized by the reporting process, has developed a platform designed to make it easier for other survivors to give their account. The program, Callisto, now in use at 12 colleges, includes a feature that helps identify repeat offenders.

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National Public Radio
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Anya Kamenetz
12/5/2017

Fourth-grade students in the US slipped to the 16th spot on international rankings of reading comprehension, according to data from the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study. PIRLS also measured students' online reading skills, where data show US students scored above the international average.

12/5/2017

New York City educator Jessica Silva is teaching computer science by having students unplug their devices at first and then use interactive games to learn about algorithms that can be used to code. Silva's school is one of 23 elementary schools taking part in the city's Computer Science for All initiative, now in its second year.

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EdSurge
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computer science, New York City
12/5/2017

Children diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder who played a video game for four weeks showed signs of improvement in a study of 348 children between ages 8 and 12. The company that produces the game plans to seek approval from the US Food and Drug Administration to make the first prescription video game.

12/5/2017

Laptops are seen as an important tool for studying by 86% of college students, and 53% say they prefer classes that use digital tools, according to McGraw-Hill Education's 2017 Digital Study Trends Survey. The data also showed that 60% of students feel that digital tools have helped improve their academic performance.

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EdTech online
12/5/2017

Google announced Monday it would be taking several steps to flag and remove objectionable content from YouTube following criticism about some videos that seem to show child abuse. Google plans to hire up to 10,000 people who will ensure that content complies with YouTube's policies.

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The Guardian (London)