Educational Leadership
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/13/2017

The presence of artificial intelligence in schools is expected to grow, with some reports predicting 47.5% growth by 2021. Schools already are using the technology in various ways, such as identifying what math students know and then providing tailored assignments.

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artificial intelligence, AI
12/13/2017

Richard Gordon IV, principal of Paul Robeson High School in Philadelphia, says the key question that helped the school improve its academic performance after nearly closing in 2012 is: "How do you get kids to love the idea of coming to school?" Gordon, who has been named the nation's top administrator by Education Dive, credits staff, community partners and students for the school's success.

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Richard Gordon IV
12/13/2017

The World Health Organization estimates poor mental health costs the global economy $1 trillion a year, so it's necessary employers create a culture where people feel as uninhibited to discuss mental health as they do physical health, writes Jennifer V. Miller. Listen to people and thank them for confiding, she writes, but avoid giving advice or pep talks.

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SmartBrief/Leadership
12/13/2017

South Carolina education officials expect to lose thousands of educators in 2018 when a key retirement benefit is slated to end. Bernadette Hampton, president of the S.C. Education Association, says rural school districts will be especially hard hit by the expected exodus.

12/13/2017

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe this week signed an executive order directing the state board of education to accelerate college programs for prospective teachers to stem a shortage of educators. The governor also included budgetary funding to automate teacher licensing and help minority teaching candidates pay for tests and test-preparation programs.

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Gov. Terry McAuliffe
12/12/2017

A voter-created fund will provide three-day, overnight outdoor learning opportunities for more than 36,000 fifth- and sixth-grade students in Oregon this year. In 2016, voters approved using lottery fees to fund outdoor adventures for middle-schoolers for up to five days.

12/12/2017

College and university leaders should write job ads that clearly spell out the requirements of the position and avoid asking applicants for too many materials up front, writes academic job search expert Karen Kelsky. A committee also may want to avoid asking for reference letters early in the process, she suggests.

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job search
12/12/2017

Recent breaches show that the strategy many boards embrace for their cybersecurity efforts is falling short, Axio Global Chief Technology Officer Jason Christopher writes. Boards can implement a more effective strategy by looking at exposure in financial terms, focusing on a maturity-based cyberevaluation framework and having resources in place to recover from an attack.

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Forbes
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Jason Christopher
12/12/2017

Students at a Texas school have created a Christmas tree -- to be auctioned off as a school fundraiser -- from green plastic drinking bottles and old transparency sheets used with overhead projectors. Students cut and spun the bottles to create the limbs and used transparency sheets to make ornaments and holders for lights.

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Texas school
12/12/2017

Seventh-graders at a Washington school will become certified in Microsoft Word, PowerPoint and Excel as part of the school's semesterlong computer essentials class. The certification makes them more marketable in the workplace, teacher Devina Khan said.