K-12
Top stories summarized by our editors
7/19/2018

Steve Kaufmann of Canada, who speaks 16 languages, and Shannon Kennedy of California, who speaks nine languages, recently shared during a radio interview how they became interested in becoming multilingual. They also discussed how they keep up with speaking so many tongues and why language learning should be enjoyable and meaningful.

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WBUR-FM (Boston)
7/19/2018

North Carolina lawmakers recently passed legislation that enables Cherokee Nation members who do not hold degrees or certification in education to teach the tribe's language and culture to native students because of dying fluency. The law also will allow Cherokee language courses to count toward college-entrance requirements.

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Cherokee Nation
7/19/2018

A group of business students who took an algebra test in a room filled with the scent of coffee scored significantly better than students who took the test in an unscented room, according to a study from researchers at the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey. Researchers posit the smell of coffee may have a placebo effect on people.

7/18/2018

As rates of anxiety among American teens have increased, author Katherine Reynolds Lewis says she sees a link to the decline of parent-free play in which unsupervised children take risks and develop important social and emotional skills. Another author, neuropsychologist William Stixrud, says students should be in charge of their own academics and their own time, so they are motivated to keep learning.

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National Public Radio
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Katherine Reynolds Lewis
7/18/2018

The American Civil Liberties Union is speaking out against some schools' plans to use facial recognition technology as part of their video surveillance systems. The ACLU has stated its concerns about privacy and hacking, including the potential that someone's facial image could be used to track their movements retroactively.

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T.H.E. Journal
7/18/2018

The share of federal dollars that support programs for children is expected to decline by about 27% over the next decade, according to a report published Wednesday by the Urban Institute. The report also finds that spending on education is expected to decline, but it projects a slight increase in spending on children's health and income security.

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Urban Institute
7/18/2018

Some schools are promoting a culture of leadership, in part, by engaging teachers, National Board Certified Teacher Tiffany Osborne writes. In this blog post, she shares examples of this approach, including the Teacher Advisory group started to drive improvement in the middle school in which she is associate principal.

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Teacher Advisory group
7/18/2018

Elementary- and middle-school students in New Orleans are participating in a six-week summer camp to learn more about local civil rights history. Students are learning math, writing and character-building and are interviewing community leaders about efforts for equality, including camp creator Leona Tate about her experiences integrating an all-white school in the 1960s.

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WWNO-FM (New Orleans)
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New Orleans
7/18/2018

Teachers in a California school district recently attended a weeklong training to learn how to implement the Columbia University Teachers College model for writing instruction. Under the guidelines, students are to spend between 45 and 60 minutes a day on writing instruction in a format that includes techniques, brainstorming and independent writing time.

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Columbia University
7/18/2018

Two high schools in a Maryland district are working with the Equal Opportunity Schools program to increase enrollment of students who are underrepresented in Advanced Placement courses. Using the program, educators created outreach plans to find and recruit students for AP classes, such as having students shadow another AP student for a day.