STEM Careers
Top stories summarized by our editors
5/24/2018

Students at an Indiana high school, who are members of the 3D Innovators Club, have programmed a robot to perform tasks alongside a conveyer belt. The students worked to determine whether the robot could use the tools to serve breakfast for their school recently.

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Indiana high school
5/24/2018

Flood risks could cause home values in US coastal areas to decline over the next 20 years, states a recent paper by two economists. Home prices along the coast could fall as much as 16%, the researchers report, noting that some coastal residents underestimate the effect of sea-level rise.

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Pacific Magazine
5/24/2018

A hydrogel developed by University of Florence chemists is helping remove damaging tape that was placed on ancient artwork and historical documents to repair tears. The gel is made mostly of water with small amounts of organic solvents that lift the tape's adhesive from the paper fibers.

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University of Florence
5/24/2018

Tracking the migration of bats known to host the Ebola virus may help researchers predict where the deadly disease may strike next so measures can be put in place to prevent an outbreak, according to findings published in Scientific Reports. Researchers first created a model that retroactively predicted 2014 Ebola outbreaks by charting bat migration and now plan to use the model to figure out where Ebola may strike next.

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LiveScience
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Ebola
5/24/2018

Thalidomide and similar drugs being used to treat cancer work by using the body's cell-disposal system to eliminate damaging proteins. Now, researchers are focusing their efforts on developing such protein degradation methods to treat a wider range of diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.

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Thalidomide, Alzheimer, Parkinson
5/24/2018

People attending barbecues may absorb chemicals linked to increased cancer risk through their skin as well as by inhaling them through the air and by eating grilled meat, according to a study published in Environmental Science & Technology. Researchers tested levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons absorbed through the air, skin and food consumption in 20 barbecue attendees and found skin absorption to be the second-highest exposure route.

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LiveScience
5/24/2018

Higher levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere appear to lower the amount of B vitamins produced in rice, according to findings published in Science Advances. The amounts of other nutrients such as iron, zinc and protein are also affected, researchers say.

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Science News
5/24/2018

A group of cells that directs how other cells in an embryo develop has been shown to exist in humans, according to findings published in Nature. Researchers found the cellular group, known as the organizer, by grafting human stem cells treated with a pair of signaling proteins into chick embryos.

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The Scientist online
5/24/2018

The bilirubin that causes jaundice in the majority of newborns may be an evolutionary defense against sepsis, according to a study in Scientific Reports. Researchers found that bilirubin reduced the growth of Group B Streptococcus, the most common bacteria inducing sepsis in newborns, by 33%.

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The Conversation (US)
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Group B Streptococcus
5/24/2018

The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has awarded a grant of nearly $3 million to the University of Arizona for a pain study. Research will focus on how stress may be linked to pain.