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6/25/2018

Teachers should lean into controversial topics and teach students how to have hard conversations, asserts Jennifer Rich, an assistant professor in the College of Education at Rowan University. In this commentary, she looks at how one fifth-grade educator fostered open discussions with her students about events in Charlottesville, Va., as well as the migrant crisis and gun violence in schools.

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The Hechinger Report
6/25/2018

Technology has improved teaching and learning, according to 82% of teachers surveyed by MidAmerica Nazarene University. About 73% of teachers report their students use laptops and tablets daily in the classroom.

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eSchool News
6/25/2018

About 100 school districts across the country have publicly declared their support for the rights of immigrant students. In Chicago, the district has been giving out "Know Your Safety Plan" tip sheets with advice from the National Immigrant Justice Center.

6/25/2018

Educators can establish classroom practices that allow introverted students to show what they know, writes Katy Farber, a professional-development coordinator. In this blog post, Farber shares several strategies including using online tools, allowing students to have more choice about presentations and giving students more downtime.

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Edutopia online
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Katy Farber
6/25/2018

States would get more autonomy to set their own goals for career and technical education under Senate legislation to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act. The bill, which has bipartisan support, also would require that a school's CTE programs be responsive to state or local needs.

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Carl D. Perkins, Senate
6/25/2018

Five states -- Nebraska, North Dakota, West Virginia, Kentucky and South Dakota -- earned top marks for their support for public schools, according to a report by the Schott Foundation for Public Education and the Network for Public Education. The report assessed states based on school privatization, accountability and oversight, and other issues related to charter schools or voucher programs.

6/25/2018

More than 60% of young people in Mississippi who go through a major depressive episode don't get any professional help, according to 2017 statistics. Teri Brister, director of information and support for the National Alliance on Mental Illness, describes the state's mental health care system for children -- in which 14 community health centers operate independently -- as "disjointed."

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The Hechinger Report
6/25/2018

Unpaid meal debt in Denver's public schools rose from $13,000 to $356,000 following a decision to provide meals to all students -- even the ones who do not pay. "In many districts, allowing all kids to automatically get a free meal ... can turn into a real financial challenge for the program," said Diane Pratt-Heavner, director of media relations for the School Nutrition Association.

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Chalkbeat
6/22/2018

Students are more likely to pay attention if they have the motivation to do so, according to research by psychologists Barbara Rogoff and Maricela Correa-Chavez. The pair compared white students from California and Maya students from Guatemala and suggested that students from Guatemala may be more motivated to pay attention because their parents give them more autonomy and freedom to set their own goals.

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National Public Radio
6/22/2018

The gap between default rates of black and white student-loan borrowers remains "large and statistically significant," even when controlled for factors such as income, loan amounts and whether a degree was earned, according to a report. Researchers say a lack of access to support systems such as loan counseling or servicing could play a role in the disparity.

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Inside Higher Ed