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7/24/2017

Technology increasingly is part of teaching and learning, and a recent report from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt finds that educators are more confident in education technology. The survey also reveals the need for additional planning time to implement technology and more devices.

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T.H.E. Journal
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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
7/24/2017

An international robotics tournament, held last week in Washington, D.C., highlighted the barriers that students from some countries face as they pursue their education. Students from impoverished countries discussed the challenges of meeting the expectations of a technology-driven world when they lack resources, opportunities and political support.

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National Public Radio
7/24/2017

Many colleges, including the University of Utah and the Georgia Institute of Technology, are opening innovation hubs to help students create their own businesses. Students involved in Georgia Tech's CREATE-X have created 81 startups, bringing in more than $2 million in follow-on investments over the past three years, officials say.

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CNBC
7/24/2017

Students' love of texting and communicating via social media present an opportunity for English-language arts lessons, writes fifth-grade teacher Marissa King. In this blog post, she shares ways to leverage students' fluency in pop culture and social media to compare writing contexts and teach formal writing.

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Edutopia online
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social media, Marissa King
7/24/2017

Some students at a Virginia middle school are attending weekly classes designed to promote reading throughout the summer and develop their literacy skills. Funded by a grant and led by teachers, students have been reading fiction and nonfiction books, doing word analysis, playing games and visiting the public library's book mobile.

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Virginia middle school
7/24/2017

The Global STEM Challenges Program in Fairfax County, Va., is engaging 90 students in solving real-world problems using science, technology, engineering and math. One educator in the district said the success and potential to expand the program will depend on how students perform on state exams.

7/24/2017

Therapists at one school in Washington, D.C., where all students have special needs, are paid largely with Medicaid funds. Officials there say they are concerned that proposed changes to the nation's health care law could affect Medicaid funding.

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Medicaid
7/24/2017

What does it mean to prepare graduates for college and career? K-12 leadership experts Jill Berkowicz and Ann Myers in this blog post take on this question, suggesting strategies such as adopting design-thinking in schools and partnering with local businesses.

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Ann Myers, Jill Berkowicz
7/24/2017

College Board data show more students are taking Advanced Placement exams, in part, because of open-access policies in some schools. However, research on universal AP is mixed, with some saying it highlights what is needed for college-level work and others noting it's like "throwing students out there without a lifeboat," said Denise Pope, a senior lecturer at Stanford University.

7/24/2017

Kindergarten teacher Sonja Murray and her colleagues at a prekindergarten-through-grade-12 Title I school in Mississippi take steps to educate parents and caregivers about how children can be successful in kindergarten. In this commentary, she notes that outreach includes giving parents and day care centers lists of top skills.

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The Hechinger Report