Health IT News
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9/22/2016

A Ketchum study found that 58% of smartphone users in the US have shared their medical information with a caregiver through the internet and 25% have sent a text or email with a photo of a medical issue to a physician. Forty-seven percent of respondents have apps to track health, medicine, fitness or exercise, and 83% who have exercise or fitness apps use them one or more times per week.

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Healthcare IT News
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Ketchum
9/22/2016

Gemalto's Breach Level Index showed that data breaches across the world are increasing by 15% in the first half of this year compared with the previous six months, with 4.8 billion private records stolen since 2013 and the US having the most breaches, at 728, followed by the UK, at 61, and the rest of Europe, at 25. Though 27% of global breaches were in the health care industry, only 5% of the exposed records came from this sector, compared with 12% in the previous six months.

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Infosecurity (U.K.)
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Gemalto
9/22/2016

The Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT reported that 96% of hospitals across the US are using EHR systems. Arizona, Louisiana and South Dakota are the states with the lowest percentage of hospitals that have the capability to exchange summary of care records, while Alaska, Delaware, Maryland and Rhode Island have the highest percentage of hospitals capable of interoperability.

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ONC
9/22/2016

Newly appointed National Coordinator for Health IT Vindell Washington said he will concentrate on the continued implementation of the ONC's Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap under HHS' initiative to move toward value-based payments. Information sharing is crucial to lay the foundation for the Obama administration's priorities, including delivery system reform and the Precision Medicine and Cancer Moonshot initiatives, Washington said.

9/22/2016

Forty-six percent of respondents to a Silicon Valley Bank survey said big data would have the greatest impact on health care delivery next year, while 35% said it would be artificial intelligence. The major sectors to keep an eye on in the coming year include augmented or virtual reality, health care robotics and the internet of things, the report said.

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Health IT Analytics
9/22/2016

Congress should accelerate the finalization and passage of national medical research legislation that was recently approved by House and Senate committees, the American Medical Informatics Association says. AMIA members also cited health IT's importance to patient safety and the modernization of clinical trials.

9/22/2016

Health care executives are struggling to address cybersecurity risks due to the lack of cybersecurity defense systems and risk assessments among patient care organizations, said CHIME President and CEO Russell Branzell at the CHIME Lead Forum in Toronto. They are also being challenged by the insufficient oversight among hospital boards of directors and questionable supply chains, Branzell said.

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Russell Branzell
9/22/2016

Recently, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued a new requirement for the electronic submission of workplace injuries and illness records. Although in effect, elements of this rule will not be enforced until Nov. 1. Aon experts recently explored the new OSHA requirements and discussed how compliance with these new regulatory changes my materially impact your organization's Total Cost of Risk. Listen to the replay.

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aon.com
9/21/2016

The FDA is encouraging computer programmers, clinical researchers, public health advocates, innovators and entrepreneurs to develop an app that would connect opioid users who have overdosed with someone carrying naloxone, an opioid overdose antidote. Interested participants may register for the competition starting Friday.

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FDA, naloxone
9/21/2016

An experimental antibiotic gel that could revolutionize ear infection treatment penetrated the eardrums of chinchillas and cleared an infection within a week, researchers reported in Science Translational Medicine. The antibiotic was undetectable in the animals' blood, and the eardrums appeared normal after the gel dissolved about three weeks after application.

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NBC News