Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/21/2018

Ctenocephalides felis, or the domestic cat flea, may be developing resistance to commonly used insecticides, but until now, progress on a vaccine has been limited. Researchers recently used transcriptomics and proteomics data from C. felis to identify protective recombinant antigens, developed a subcutaneous vaccine and reported in Parasites & Vectors that the antigens could be used alone or in combination in vaccines to control cat fleas.

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American Veterinarian
2/21/2018

The ONC has recognized the National Committee for Quality Assurance eMeasure testing laboratory as an authorized testing lab, allowing it to test health IT products for the agency's Health IT Certification Program. NCQA's testing method for electronic clinical quality measures was approved as an alternative to the ONC's current testing procedure.

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EHR Intelligence
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ONC, NCQA
2/21/2018

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that the adoption of EHR systems did not reduce administrative costs, which may be attributed to differing price schedules and contracts between hospitals, health plans and payers. The study, which looked at billing at a North Carolina academic health care system, indicates that "significant investments in certified health information technology have not reduced high billing costs in the United States," researchers wrote.

2/21/2018

If adopted, Washington state's Substitute Senate Bill 5411/HB 1473 would limit the use of telehealth eye care technologies while requiring costlier and unneeded examinations, the Federal Trade Commission wrote in a letter to Republican state Rep. Paul Graves. The bill would prevent the state's ophthalmologists and optometrists from dispensing prescriptions for glasses or contact lenses without first performing an eye exam in person, which the FTC says would unfairly limit access to eye care services.

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mHealth Intelligence
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Federal Trade Commission
2/21/2018

Anthropology professor Trudy Turner's study of monkeys began with population genetics studies that led to a larger study of simian immunodeficiency virus, which is similar to HIV but does not cause similarly devastating symptoms. Researchers have build a substantial biobank, and the international study might lead to insights about HIV as well as other diseases that affect human and nonhuman primates.

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HIV, Immunodeficiency
2/21/2018

Veterinarians, scientists, communications staff and lab administrators from North America and Europe explored ways to build public trust in animal research at the recent Basel Declaration Society conference, discussing the importance of nonhuman primates in neurology research, myths about animal research and more. FBR President Matthew R. Bailey spoke at the event, noting a shift in animal rights activism "from extreme activities to public policy activities." Bailey urged the research community to "stop operating based on fear" and embrace transparency and openness around their work.

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Speaking of Research
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NIH
2/21/2018

Scientists have created a second successful human-animal hybrid embryo comprising 99.99% sheep cells and 0.01% human cells by count, moving scientists one step closer to being able to grow human organs in animals for transplant. Only about 2,000 people in the US get heart transplants each year out of more than 100,000 Americans who need them, and 22 people on the US organ transplant list die each day.

2/21/2018

Cloning had become somewhat normalized in the two decades since Dolly the sheep was cloned from an adult sheep's mammary gland cell, but news that scientists in China had cloned two monkeys renewed debate on the ethics of cloning. The scientists in China say that cloned nonhuman primates can advance research, but cloning is most likely to be used in the future to produce better livestock, says cloning expert Robin Lovell-Badge.

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Dolly
2/20/2018

Three studies in the journal Science detailed how CRISPR gene-editing technology can be used to advance disease detection and treatment. DNA Endonuclease Targeted CRISPR Trans Reporter, or DETECTR, is being developed to identify human papillomavirus strains; SHERLOCK version 2.0 can detect and distinguish Zika or dengue viruses in blood samples; and the CRISPR-mediated analog multi-event recording apparatus, or CAMERA, is being developed to make cells record exposure to pollutants.

2/20/2018

Over 88% of companies were targeted by email phishing scams in 2017, up from 75% in 2016, per a Proofpoint report. Spoofed identities were on the rise in 2017, and social media-themed attacks also were significant, the report shows.