Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/20/2017

A McKinsey study in 2012 predicted that health care providers would be receiving a higher percentage of their revenue from individual patients than traditional payers, but close to 50% of health care consumers responding to a Healthcare Financial Management Association survey expressed dissatisfaction with their provider's billing processes. Implementing a consumer-centric approach in billing and payment collection may bolster providers' return on investment and patient satisfaction while reducing patient debt, writes PatientPay founder Tom Furr.

4/20/2017

Hospitals are catching up to the bring-your-own-device wave, with nearly two-thirds having developed a formal mobile strategy, compared with 34% in 2012, reports health care communications firm Spok. The company suggests that hospitals have realized that many of their medical professionals are using their own mobile devices on the job.

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CIO.com
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mobile device, mobile devices, Spok, Spok
4/20/2017

Wyoming has the highest rate of EHR adoption across the US at 78.6%, followed by South Dakota, Utah, Iowa and North Dakota, according to a report from SK&A. The lowest EHR adoption rates were found in Maryland, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Louisiana and New York.

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BeckersASC.com
4/19/2017

Animals in biomedical research are well cared for by researchers and by a husbandry team that provides food, activity and enrichment, writes Meagan Shetler, lab animal supervisor in the University of Kentucky's Division of Laboratory Animal Resources. Shetler, like other technicians and researchers, chose an animal research path because she wanted to help end the suffering of animals and people, and it's time to set the public record straight, she writes.

4/19/2017

HIMSS Analytics found that almost 80% of 125 health IT executives and professionals surveyed cited employee security awareness as their top health care data security concern, followed by 69% who cited exposure from partners or third parties and 54% who cited securing wireless or bring-your-own devices. Respondents said budget concerns, competing priorities, employee awareness and training, impact to clinical workflows and in-house expertise are the top barriers to adopting security programs.

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Health IT Security
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HIMSS Analytics
4/19/2017

The 32 initial participants in the CMS Accountable Health Communities program will need to keep comprehensive databases with information on health care providers who can address health-related social needs, collect and share beneficiary data, and monitor and evaluate how well beneficiaries' social needs are being met. The program has three tracks -- awareness, assistance and alignment -- focused on increasing beneficiary awareness of available services, supporting community services for high-risk beneficiaries and improving alignment of services and needs.

4/19/2017

A team of scientists at Stanford University developed a wristband-type of wearable sensor that can diagnose and monitor diseases such as diabetes and cystic fibrosis by measuring the molecular constituents of sweat, according to a study published in the journal PNAS. The device can run with a smartphone, which can send the measurements to a center to be reviewed.

4/19/2017

There was a 320% increase in the number of health care providers affected by hacking incidents from 2015 to 2016, with 78% of record breaches occurring at health care provider organizations in 2016 and 40% of large incidents involving unauthorized access or disclosure of information, according to a CynergisTek report. Researchers also found that HHS' Office for Civil Rights received more than $23.5 million last year in settlements for HIPAA violations that occurred in 2012 and 2013 at 13 provider organizations.

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Healthcare IT News
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HHS, civil rights
4/19/2017

Scientists have identified a peptide on the skin of the frog Hydrophylax bahuvistara, found in southern India, that interferes with hemagglutinin surface proteins on H1 influenza viruses, killing the pathogen without harming healthy cells. The scientists report in Immunity that a synthesized version of the protein, dubbed urumin, killed dozens of influenza strains in laboratory tests. The approach also protected mice from infection, so they plan to try it in other species.

4/19/2017

Researchers report in Science Advances that they corrected gene mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy using CRISPR-Cpf1 in mice and patient-derived stem cells. Function was at least partially restored in cardiomyocyte cultures, and the results show the potential of CRISPR-Cpf1 to correct disease-causing genetic mutations, experts said.