Health IT News
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/8/2017

Engineers at the University of California at San Diego have developed a 3D-printed smartphone case and companion app that can check and record the user's blood glucose levels. A permanent sensor is embedded in the case and works with single-use enzyme-packed pellets in an attached 3D-printed stylus to measure glucose levels in a drop of blood and transmit the information via Bluetooth to the app.

12/8/2017

A draft guidance document describes the types of clinical decision support software the FDA will and will not regulate, and another draft indicates that mobile apps intended solely for promoting or maintaining a healthy lifestyle fall outside the agency's purview. A final guidance document establishes a risk-based regulatory framework for assessing the safety, efficacy and performance of software-as-a-medical-device.

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FDA
12/8/2017

Anil Sethi is leaving his job as Apple's health team director and starting Ciitizen, a startup to help people obtain and share personal health information, ethical wills and advanced care directives. Sethi joined Apple when the company bought his medical records startup, Gliimpse.

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CNBC
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Anil Sethi, Apple
12/7/2017

The National Quality Forum received a list of 32 clinical quality measures under consideration as part of the CMS' Meaningful Measures initiative, and CMS Chief Medical Officer and Center for Clinical Standards and Quality Director Kate Goodrich said the measures are expected to "help quantify health care outcomes and track the effectiveness, safety, and patient-centeredness of the care provided." Stakeholders have until today to submit comments on the 2017 MUC list.

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EHR Intelligence
12/7/2017

A hacker may have accessed and stolen the data of 18,470 patients at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit in October, according to the health system's officials. Stolen email credentials of some employees could have been used by the hacker to access email accounts containing patient data, including names, medical record numbers, medical conditions, provider names and dates of birth.

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Healthcare IT News
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Henry Ford Health System
12/7/2017

A survey by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices found that nearly half of 778 health care providers polled said they used device encryption when receiving texted medical orders. Researchers also found that phone/device autocorrection resulting in incorrect drug or patient names was the top concern with texting orders, followed by confusing abbreviated text terminology and patient misidentification.

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Health IT Security
12/7/2017

A pilot program for OurNotes, an initiative targeting patient-provider collaboration in writing clinical notes and care plans within a shared EHR, will begin in the spring at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the University of Colorado, the University of Washington and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Beth Israel, which uses its own EHR system, will aid in organizing and standardizing efforts with the other sites, which use Epic systems, said Dr. Matthew Germak of Beth Israel.

12/7/2017

Inadequate standardization of health data is the primary barrier to achieving interoperability as federal policies have made information blocking less prevalent, said Bryan Batson, chief medical information officer at Mississippi-based Hattiesburg Clinic. More health care leaders should call for stricter standardization to better manage increasing volumes of data, Batson said.

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EHR Intelligence
12/7/2017

Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Jerry Moran, R-Kan., introduced legislation aimed at modernizing the Department of Veterans Affairs' health care system. The bill includes a provision that would enable VA-affiliated providers with an active, unrestricted state license to practice telemedicine across state lines and calls for the creation of a Veterans Community Care Program and medical records sharing between VA facilities and non-VA providers.

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mHealth Intelligence
12/7/2017

You can play a key role in fostering the next generation of health care IT leaders by making a donation to the CHIME Education Foundation. Over the past few years, the number of applications has quadrupled as more and more members seek to sharpen their leadership skills. Your support can make a difference in the lives of health care professionals, as well as in the lives of countless health care patients for many years to come. Learn more.

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chimecentral.org