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8/27/2015

The convergence of psychoanalysis with neuroscience is an emerging field that could unravel newer and better ways of understanding the human mind, according to neuropsychologist and psychoanalyst Mark Solms. He sees the distinct disciplines as two views of one organ, and his field of interest explores the connections between external behavior and the distinct regions of the brain involved with those behaviors.

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The Atlantic online
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Neuropsychoanalysis
8/27/2015

Surgeons called in to the hospital after midnight had medical complication rates for surgeries the next day that were similar to their colleagues who did not work during the night, according to a study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Toronto researchers said when physicians saw two or more patients after working at night it did raise the likelihood of next-day complications but not of death or readmission.

8/27/2015

The smaller of the National Zoo's twin panda cubs died Wednesday despite monitoring and "extreme efforts" by the veterinary medical team, said chief veterinarian Don Neiffer. Contrary to some reports, mother Mei Xiang was treating both cubs with appropriate attention with support from staff, who were switching the cubs at regular intervals so Mei Xiang could care for one at a time. A necropsy is planned, and the information from the entire experience will help future panda cubs, the team hopes. The remaining cub is doing well, Dr. Neiffer said.

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Mei Xiang, National Zoo
8/27/2015

Researchers found a modest, but not statistically significant, correlation between A1C levels and cardiovascular events among type 2 diabetes patients with or without vascular disease, according to a Dutch study in Diabetes Care. The findings, based on 1,687 adults, also revealed about a 16% increased risk for all-cause mortality with every 1% increase in A1C levels among diabetes patients with and without vascular disease.

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diabetes
8/27/2015

A case report published in Diabetes Care showed that the presence of alpha-globin chain mutant hemoglobin Wayne interferes with A1C measurements and might lead to a misdiagnosis of type 2 diabetes in patients. Canadian researchers investigated the case of a 66-year-old Caucasian female who had persistently high A1C levels and experienced symptoms of episodic hypoglycemia while taking metformin and insulin glargine.

8/27/2015

A New Zealand study revealed that firstborn girls had a 29% increased likelihood of being overweight and 40% greater odds of being obese in adulthood than sisters who were born later. The findings in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health were based on over 13,000 pairs of sisters.

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HealthDay News
8/27/2015

ANA has released a position statement calling for all health care personnel to be vaccinated with exemptions only for religious beliefs or medical contraindications. "ANA's new position aligns registered nurses with the best current evidence on immunization safety and preventing diseases such as measles," President Pamela Cipriano said.

8/27/2015

A variety of health technologies could help providers enhance care quality while cutting costs, but they are surprisingly underused, writes Matt Schuchardt of HIMSS Analytics. His list of 18 overlooked technologies includes bed management, speech recognition, nurse scheduling and communications, single sign-on, and business intelligence systems. These technologies may be underused because they are new, only recently developed enough for hospital use or too sophisticated for smaller facilities, Schuchardt writes.

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Healthcare IT News
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HIMSS Analytics
8/27/2015

The College of the Menominee Nation in Wisconsin worked with the Sustainable Development Institute to develop three free community gardens to help increase access to fresh fruits and vegetables among tribal members. The Menominee Nation's reservation, with only one grocery store, is considered a food desert and some tribal members cannot afford to buy produce.

8/27/2015

High-intensity workouts can help people burn more calories but they also increase stress on joints and muscles, which could raise the risk of injury and set-back, says registered dietitian and trainer Jason Machowsky. He said workouts should include both movement quality, which is improving exercise technique, and movement quantity, which is adding weight or intensity to burn more calories and increase strength.

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Jason Machowsky