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2/8/2016

A study in the journal Physiology & Behavior showed that 61% of US adults gained weight while on vacation, ranging from an average of 0.7 pounds to as much as 7 pounds, which tended to stay on after returning home. Researchers evaluated 122 adults, ages 18 to 65 and found that vacation weight gain was attributed to an increased intake of calories, especially from alcohol. They also said that the results support the theory of "creeping obesity," wherein adults gain small amounts of weight over a long period.

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HealthDay News
2/8/2016

Registered dietitian Toby Amidor says heart-healthy foods to try during National Heart Health Month in February include chickpeas, pistachios and salmon, which may help lower total cholesterol. Concord grape juice contains polyphenols for heart health, dried tart cherries have anthocyanins that are linked to a lower risk of stroke in women, and dark chocolate is rich in antioxidants, which may help control blood pressure and inflammation, Amidor says.

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Toby Amidor, blood pressure
2/8/2016

More than 2 million Americans practice tai chi, which is based on the idea that balancing opposing forces in the body can promote energy and boost physical and mental health. Instructor Scott Cole calls tai chi "moving meditation" that can be done anywhere at anytime and said it improves balance, strength, mobility and flexibility.

2/8/2016

Veterinarian Doug Mader says the staff at the Turtle Hospital in Marathon, Fla., sees six to eight cases of fibropapillomatosis each week, compared with six to eight cases per month 20 years ago. Fibropapillomatosis is caused by a virus that sparks development of tumors in turtles. About half of the area's green sea turtles are infected, and many arrive at the hospital too sick to be saved.

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PhysOrg.com
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Turtle Hospital
2/8/2016

Lead-tainted water in Flint, Mich., threatens pets, too, state veterinarian James Averill warns residents. Two dogs, one stray and one pet, have tested positive for lead toxicity in recent months. Dr. Averill said owners should give pets filtered or bottled water. Anyone who notices that an animal isn't acting normally should contact a veterinarian for help.

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MichiganRadio.org
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Flint
2/8/2016

The American Diabetes Association and Lilly Diabetes conducted a three-year, online survey involving more than 6,500 caregivers between 2013 and 2015 and found an 11% increase in the number of children with type 1 diabetes who had a clear understanding of diabetes management after attending an ADA summer camp. The findings also showed a 10% increase in the number of children who were able to manage diabetes-related problems independently, while 19% of newly diagnosed children improved their ability to manage diabetes-related issues after the camp.

2/8/2016

Many diabetes patients worldwide don't have access to insulin because of cost, as well as the lack of quantification at the national level, determination of what is needed at the health system's lower levels and poor in-country distribution, according to a report in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. Researchers also found that 8 of 19 countries provided free insulin to patients, while the average annual cost of a year's insulin supply in countries where patients had to pay was $35.40 in the public sector and $95.71 in the private sector.

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diabetes
2/8/2016

HHS has drafted revisions for its rules governing confidentiality for patient records about the abuse of alcohol and drugs. The proposal is an attempt to facilitate electronic information exchange while honoring confidentiality, according to the draft. Feedback will be accepted until April 11.

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HHS
2/8/2016

Children who drank at least three glasses of milk daily, took vitamin D supplements and exercised more than two hours a day all had higher serum vitamin D levels than those who didn't drink milk, take vitamin D supplements or exercise. The findings were published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

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Examiner.com
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vitamin D
2/8/2016

A study published in the journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention found that patients with asthma, respiratory allergies and eczema have a lower likelihood of developing glioma, adding to previous research with similar findings. Researchers said now that the link has been substantiated, studies should explore the mechanism behind the lower risk.

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HealthDay News
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asthma