News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/1/2017

A study in The BMJ found an association between obesity and 11 cancers, including multiple myeloma, colon cancer, biliary tract system cancer, breast cancer and kidney cancer. UK researchers evaluated 95 meta-analyses and found that the increase in cancer risk for every 5-kg/m2 increase in body mass index ranged from 9% for rectal cancer in male patients to 56% for biliary tract system cancer.

3/1/2017

UK researchers found a longer median duration of hypoglycemia during the night, compared with during the daytime, among young adults with type 1 diabetes. The findings in Diabetes Care, based on 37 individuals who underwent simultaneous electrocardiogram and continuous glucose monitoring, revealed that bradycardia was more frequent during nocturnal hypoglycemia and atrial ectopics was more frequent during daytime hypoglycemia.

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Diabetes Care, bradycardia
3/1/2017

Adolescents and young adults with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have diabetic kidney disease, arterial stiffness, hypertension, peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy, compared with type 1 diabetes patients, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Researchers used a cohort of 2,018 type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients and found that most type 1 diabetes patients were normal weight or overweight and were white, compared with type 2 diabetes patients, most of whom were obese or overweight and tended to be black.

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peripheral neuropathy
3/1/2017

Advanced cancer patients who did not get early palliative care had a threefold higher risk of ICU admission in the final six months of life and a fourfold higher risk of terminal ICU admission, compared with patients in a palliative care program, according to a study in The Oncologist. Patients receiving standard care were 90% less likely to enter hospice.

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palliative care, cancer
3/1/2017

University of California at Davis researchers found that using an image reconstruction method with quantitative correction for the EXPLORER total-body PET scanner yielded a nearly seven times higher signal-to-noise ratio while using very low radiation doses, compared with current whole-body scanners. The findings were published in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology.

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University of California, Davis
3/1/2017

Targeting a protein called p21-activated kinase 1 in stellate cells reduced scar tissue formation and tumor growth and increased sensitivity to chemotherapy in mouse models of pancreatic cancer. The study, published in the International Journal of Cancer, is an important step toward understanding pancreatic cancer, study author Mehrdad Nikfarjam said.

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Pancreatic cancer
3/1/2017

Researchers at the University of Nebraska Medical Center and University of California at San Francisco are in the second year of a study to train care-team navigators to work with dementia patients and family caregivers. Dr. Stephen Bonasera of UNMC says early study data show an increase in caregivers reporting feeling competent and that navigators have helped find and encourage treatment of caregivers with depression.

3/1/2017

Registered dietitian nutritionists Angela Lemond and Kim Larson say cow's milk has naturally occurring vitamins and remains the healthiest milk option overall. They say newer alternatives, such as nut- or plant-based milks, may contain little of the advertised ingredient and can be mostly water and added vitamins.

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USA Today
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Angela Lemond, milk
3/1/2017

Registered dietitian Michele Szafranski of the Levine Cancer Institute says telenutrition services can help patients with high-risk cancers who live in rural areas. A study of LCI's program found patients and health care providers were satisfied with the services, and Szafranski said while telenutrition programs could be developed throughout the US, there is a regulatory issue as RDs must be registered in the state where they see patients.

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Oncology Nursing News
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Levine Cancer Institute
3/1/2017

Taxing sugar-sweetened beverages may lead to a reduction in purchases of the products, according to data from Mexico's tax program. "Findings from Mexico may encourage other countries to use fiscal policies to reduce consumption of unhealthy beverages along with other interventions to reduce the burden of chronic disease," researchers wrote in Health Affairs.

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Mexico, Health Affairs