News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
9/20/2017

A study in the International Journal of Obesity found obese men who took two-week breaks from their diet lost more weight than those who followed the diet continuously. Researchers said continuous calorie restriction may reduce resting metabolism to a point where it makes it more difficult to lose weight.

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Medical News Today
9/20/2017

One of the most difficult tasks veterinarians must perform is telling people when their pets have a serious disease, especially when the owner has recently experienced the loss of a loved one, says veterinarian Sean Owens, a professor of clinical pathology at the University of California at Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. Research published in the Veterinary Record found pet owners caring for a sick animal have elevated stress levels, general symptoms of depression and anxiety, and poor quality of life similar to people caring for sick human loved ones.

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CNN
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University of California
9/20/2017

Animals that are very large or very small -- that is, outside the Goldilocks zone -- have the highest risk of extinction, according to research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Hunting by humans is the primary threat to the largest animals, and habitat loss or modification is the main threat to the smallest animals, the researchers say.

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KTVZ-TV (Bend, Ore.), BBC
9/20/2017

PBS stations are airing a 10-part documentary about the Vietnam War, and mental health experts are warning that the series could trigger post-traumatic stress disorder in Vietnam veterans who watch it. The VA is partnering with PBS to reach veterans who might need assistance after seeing the documentary.

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National Public Radio
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VA, Vietnam war
9/20/2017

US military surgeons performed more than 9,400 surgical procedures between January 2002 and March 2013 on 5,786 Afghan civilians ages 15 and older, including some 3,300 surgeries considered essential procedures for developing countries by the World Health Organization, researchers reported in JAMA Surgery. "These findings ... demonstrate the willingness of military surgical units to commit their time, energy and resources to helping patients in need, regardless of circumstance," said Air Force Col. Peter Learn, a department head at Uniformed Services University and the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

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HealthDay News
9/20/2017

Talking to someone about issues you have with them can be difficult, but avoidance stalls real problem-solving, writes Dan Oestreich. Instead, think about how you can approach these conflicts with compassion and honesty as a way to connect rather than resorting to judgment.

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Unfolding Leadership
9/20/2017

Researchers used a cohort of 326,832 participants and found that women with diabetes and atrial fibrillation had higher rates for mortality and cardiovascular events, such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, compared with men with both diseases. The findings, presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes meeting, revealed that the standardized mortality ratio was 2.04 among women with diabetes and AFib and 1.85 for men with both conditions.

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Endocrinology Advisor
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diabetes, ischemic stroke
9/20/2017

Minimally invasive endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty resulted in fewer complications and shorter hospital stays compared with laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, according to a study presented at the 2017 Digestive Disease Week. However, the findings showed that patients who underwent LSG had greater total weight loss than those who underwent ESG or LAGB.

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Digestive Disease, LSG
9/20/2017

CDC researchers reviewed government vital statistics from 2000 to 2015 and found that opioid overdoses, which more than tripled over the period, accounted for most of the 3.5-month decrease in US life expectancy caused by drug-related overdoses by 2015. Though overall life expectancy rose during that time frame, a slight drop in life expectancy from 2014 to 2015 was the first since 1993 and was driven by rising death rates from chronic liver disease, Alzheimer's disease and unintentional injuries, which includes drug overdoses, according to the study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

9/20/2017

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases researchers examined 442 children and found that those with elevated exposure to indoor cockroach, cat and mouse allergens during the first three years of life were less likely to develop asthma by age 7, compared with those with lower indoor allergen exposure. The findings in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology also showed that prenatal exposure to maternal smoking and maternal stress and depression was tied to increased odds of pediatric asthma.