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7/22/2016

Great apes in captivity tend to develop heart disease, but it's not believed to be linked to diet or lifestyle factors like in humans. The Ape Heart Project, a partnership between the UK's Twycross Zoo and the University of Nottingham's School of Veterinary Medicine, is examining the issue and may develop guidelines for care of apes.

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BBC
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heart disease, Ape Heart Project
7/22/2016

Pavement temperatures can reach dangerous levels in summer and burn a dog's foot pads in minutes, according to veterinarian Kevin Fitzgerald, who said his hospital treats paw burns about every other day. The injuries can be severe, and it may take weeks for animals to completely recover, Dr. Fitzgerald added, urging owners to check pets' feet after a walk.

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KUSA-TV (Denver)
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Kevin Fitzgerald
7/22/2016

Cosmetic ear cropping and tail docking "are not medically indicated nor of benefit to the patient," according to the AVMA, and the practices may hinder dogs' ability to communicate. Such modifications also affect human perception, according to research published in PLOS One that found people see surgically altered dogs of certain breeds as more aggressive, and in many cases people were unaware the dogs had been modified.

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AVMA
7/22/2016

Adults with cyanotic congenital heart disease, ages older than 30, had a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those with acyanotic congenital heart disease, and both groups had an overall higher risk than the general population, according to a Danish study in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

7/22/2016

Swiss researchers found that all-cause mortality risk at one year was 13.4% for diabetes patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and 10.3% for those with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome, while those without diabetes but with STEMI and NSTE-ACS had a 6.4% and 4.4% risk, respectively. The findings in The American Journal of Cardiology, based on 9,492 ACS patients, 20.3% of whom had diabetes, revealed that diabetes patients with STEMI had a higher risk of having early stent thrombosis than those with NSTE-ACS.

7/22/2016

A study that followed middle-aged women for 15 years found gaining weight was linked to a higher risk of back pain, researchers reported in Arthritis Care & Research. Data showed a depression diagnosis also increased the risk of back pain by 37%, but researchers said vigorous physical activity reduced the risk.

7/22/2016

The group Link Together, Lead Together is uniting fitness instructors to help end the practice of using harsh putdowns and body-shaming during exercise classes. Northwestern University psychology professor Renee Engeln said she surveyed hundreds of women who participate in exercise classes and found about half said they dislike hearing comments about appearance.

7/22/2016

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Medidata are conducting a study of 40 patients with multiple myeloma that involves using wearable monitors to track participants' activity and sleep patterns, and using apps to conduct quality-of-life surveys. "This is a first exercise and the hope is that we'd be able to take learnings from this exercise to the deployment of mobile health technologies," said Kara Dennis, managing director of mobile health at Medidata.

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MobiHealthNews.com
7/22/2016

Eating smaller but more frequent meals may not help control appetite and can cause people to miss important hunger and fullness cues that regulate when and how much to eat, said registered dietitian nutritionist Carrie Dennett. What foods are eaten may be more important that than meal frequency, and if people make healthy food choices and meet their energy needs it is less likely hunger will get out of control, Dennett said.

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Carrie Dennett
7/22/2016

Excess sodium is found in a variety of packaged and restaurant foods because it adds flavor and can cover up for lower quality ingredients, says registered dietitian Robin Rood. People can take control of sodium intake by understanding their health history, including weight and blood pressure, getting enough exercise, keeping a food journal and finding alternatives to flavoring foods, Rood says.

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blood pressure