News for Providers
Top editor picks, summarized for you
9/28/2016

In the US, there are usually one or two human rabies cases every year, but around the globe, rabies kills 55,000 people annually, most exposed by rabid dogs. World Rabies Day serves as a reminder of the need to reduce rabies cases in humans and animals by focusing on education, vaccination and hopefully elimination of the deadly zoonotic virus, writes veterinarian Jill Skochdopole. Vaccinating pets, avoiding animals acting strangely and seeking medical care when possible rabies exposure has occurred can help protect people and pets.

9/28/2016

The total mortality risk was 4.6 times higher among patients with type 1 diabetes ages 30 to 39 and 5.3 times higher among those ages 40 to 44, compared with the general population, with a greater risk seen in women than men, according to a study in Diabetes Care. Researchers evaluated data from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications Study involving 502 adults with long-standing, childhood-onset type 1 diabetes and found that at least one cardiovascular event occurred in 6.6% of the 30- to 39-year-old age group and in 9.3% of the 40- to 44-year-old age group, while 4.3% and 4.9% died from each age group, respectively.

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diabetes
9/28/2016

The US Department of Education, through the Promoting Student Resilience program, is providing funding for school districts to help meet students' needs following traumatic events. "Violence tears at the fabric of a school community, and the long-term effects can be devastating," Education Secretary John King Jr. said when announcing the grants.

9/28/2016

Researchers found that diabetes patients who received add-on gliptin had a significantly increased incidence of acute pancreatitis, compared with those on placebo. The findings in Diabetes Care were based on data from three large randomized controlled trials involving 18,238 gliptin-treated patients and 18,157 placebo-treated patients.

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acute pancreatitis, diabetes
9/28/2016

High stress levels are linked to high levels of inflammation regardless of diet, even canceling out the effects of "good" fat, according to a study in Molecular Psychiatry. "The surprise here is that stress made the healthier-fat meal look like the saturated-fat meal," said lead author Janice Kiecolt-Glaser.

9/28/2016

Oncology centers with embedded palliative care teams may help improve pain management and integrate patient care, researchers told the American Academy of Pain Management's annual meeting. The study of a pilot project at the West Cancer Center showed it led to protocols for automated referrals, processes to ensure best practices for management of controlled substances and integration of patient care policies, such as nutrition support and psychological services.

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Clinical Pain Advisor
9/28/2016

Researchers found that adults who spent their first five years of life on a farm were less likely to have allergies, nasal symptoms or over-reactive airways and were less likely to develop asthma or hay fever, compared with those who lived in the city. The findings in the journal Thorax, based on European Community Respiratory Health Survey II data involving 10,000 adults in 14 countries, also showed stronger lungs among women who lived on a farm until age 5.

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asthma
9/28/2016

The CDC's new Trioplex test for diagnosing the Zika virus missed 39% of Zika infections detected by the Singleplex test, but the agency only made changes to improve the sensitivity of Trioplex months after efficacy concerns were raised by Robert Lanciotti, a microbiologist with the CDC, according to an Office of Special Counsel report.

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CDC
9/28/2016

Neurons grown from human embryonic stem cells and injected into the spines of mice with spinal cord injuries eased the animals' neuropathy and incontinence, according to a study published in Cell Stem Cell. The cells matured, migrated from the injection site to the injury site and formed connections with the animals' spinal cords.

9/28/2016

Parents should emphasize the positive effects of a healthy lifestyle when children are overweight or obese, and avoid making hurtful comments that could lead to unhealthy habits, says registered dietitian Grace Derocha. Instead of focusing on how much weight children lose, Derocha says parents should model good behaviors, avoid making comparisons, and recognize children's efforts to eat healthier and exercise.