News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
12/8/2017

Several states have taken measures to lower barriers to college enrollment and completion for foster-care youth. Not only finances, but lack of adult support and poor academic preparation due to constant school changes frustrate ambitions that most kids in foster care harbor.

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Stateline
12/8/2017

An experimental drug for glioblastoma being tested in dogs appears to slow the cancer's progression and possibly shrink tumors without harming healthy tissue, and the NIH recently awarded a grant to start a new clinical trial with a next-generation drug. Canine and human brain cancers are indistinguishable from each other under a microscope, so results from the clinical trials may benefit people with the cancer as well as dogs, says study leader veterinarian John Rossmeisl at the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine.

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brain cancer, glioblastoma, NIH
12/8/2017

German researchers analyzed data from 71 patients with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, ages at least 10, and found no between-group differences for the number of patients with an A1C of 7% or less among those on oral repaglinide and those on insulin at 12 and 24 months. The findings in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology also revealed no differences in hypoglycemic events or in mean blood glucose concentration between the groups.

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blood glucose, repaglinide
12/8/2017

Members of Congress have approved a continuing resolution to avoid a federal government shutdown this weekend and give lawmakers two more weeks to work out the details of a long-term spending plan. Funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program remains an issue, along with legislation to stabilize health insurance markets.

12/8/2017

A study estimated the number of US Alzheimer's disease cases will double by 2060, and author Ron Brookmeyer said it highlights the need for ways to better identify people who will develop the disease and for new interventions to slow or stop disease progression. The research, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association, found that about 5.7 million people will have mild cognitive impairment and 9.3 million will have Alzheimer's disease by 2060.

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HealthDay News
12/8/2017

Infant rice cereals had sixfold higher levels of inorganic arsenic, on average, compared with other grain cereals, according to a Healthy Babies Bright Futures report. The findings also showed arsenic levels in infant rice cereals averaged 85 parts per billion, lower than the average arsenic level of 103 ppb found in a FDA study in 2013 and 2014, while the highest amounts of arsenic were found in brown rice cereals.

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FDA
12/8/2017

House and Senate lawmakers voted Thursday to approve a short-term spending bill that would fund federal programs through Dec. 22, preventing an immediate government shutdown. The legislation, which goes to President Donald Trump for his expected signature, includes funding for several states running out of money for the Children's Health Insurance Program.

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PBS, USA Today
12/8/2017

Researchers and nursing homes are using an NIH grant to develop an advance care planning program for patients with Alzheimer's disease and other dementias that can be integrated into the homes' regular workflows. The project aims to create decision-making supports and have nursing home staff work with residents and their families on care goals and values.

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Alzheimer's disease, NIH
12/8/2017

Researchers from South Korea used generative networking, a machine-learning technique, to produce structural MR images from florbetapir PET scans of dementia patients, and they found the generated MR images had signal patterns similar to real MR images and a significantly smaller estimated mean absolute error of standardized uptake value ratio of cortical composite regions than other MR-less methods. The approach, described in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, could be used in amyloid quantification and "might be used to generate multimodal images of various organs for further quantitative analyses," researchers said.

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Health Imaging online
12/8/2017

An agreement was reached by Cerveau Technologies and VU Medical Center in Amsterdam for the manufacturing and supply of Cerveau's F-18 MK-6240, an investigational PET tracer for imaging neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, to support future research projects. VU Medical will also have access to Cerveau's pharmaceutical partners, which are planning a series of therapy trials.

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Cerveau, Cerveau Technologies