News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/28/2017

Researchers noted a 36% drop in hypoglycemic readings and a 39% reduction in the daily number of inpatients with two or more blood glucose values of 12.5 mmol/L or greater in the year following implementation of virtual glucose management services, according to a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Researchers conducted a 36-month cross-sectional study involving adult inpatients who underwent point-of-care blood glucose testing and used the virtual service, which includes automated reports along with clinician review and notes that are incorporated into the EMRs.

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blood glucose
3/28/2017

Researchers found an increase in the use of medications for diabetic nephropathy in the US from 2010 to 2014, with dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and sulfonylureas among the most frequently used. The findings in the Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics revealed that angiotensin receptor blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were prescribed in most treatment visits, with medication use reaching 90% during certain periods.

3/28/2017

A study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found a connection between the plasma fatty acid composition of children's blood and the risk of developing cardiometabolic disorders, including diabetes. The study noted a link between vegetable oil-based margarines and lower saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid content, as well as high polyunsaturated fatty acid content, in plasma fatty acid.

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FoodNavigator
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diabetes
3/28/2017

Parkinson's disease patients who got regular exercise totaling at least 150 minutes per week showed slower declines in mobility and health-related quality of life over two years, compared with those who did not exercise or who exercised less. The study in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease said exercise can be especially beneficial for patients with advanced disease.

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PsychCentral.com
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Parkinson
3/28/2017

Data show people born in the generations following World War II reported getting arthritis at a younger age, which Canadian researchers said could be associated with increases in obesity. The study in Arthritis Care & Research showed severely obese people were 2.5 times more likely to have arthritis, compared with people at normal weight.

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World War II
3/28/2017

The CDC's 2015 National Electronic Health Records Survey showed that 95.6% of cardiologists and 94.5% of neurologists in the US used any EHR or EMR system, while 83.2% of cardiologists and 89.9% of neurologists reported using a certified system. Psychiatrists and dermatologists were among the physician specialties with a low rate of using certified EHR systems, at 40.8% and 62.3%, respectively, the report stated.

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MedCityNews.com
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CDC
3/28/2017

Patients with depression whose resting-state functional MRI scans showed positive connectivity between the subcallosal cingulate cortex and three other brain regions had significantly higher odds of remission with cognitive behavioral therapy, while those whose scans showed negative or no connectivity were more likely to benefit from antidepressant medication, Emory University researchers reported in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Another study in The American Journal of Psychiatry also showed a weak link between patient preference and depression treatment outcomes, suggesting that fMRI may be better in personalizing treatment for those with depression.

3/28/2017

The New Jersey Hospital Association reported its participation in the CMS' Partnership for Patient quality improvement program resulted in health care cost savings of more than $641 million from 2012 to 2016. The report found the initiative prevented more than 66,000 cases of potential patient harm and reduced 30-day hospital readmission rates by 30%.

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RevCycle Intelligence
3/28/2017

Sharp HealthCare's pre-hospice Transitions program, which provides in-home care for elderly patients near the end of life to keep them out of the hospital, saved more than $4,200 per month in spending on cancer patients and almost $3,500 on those with heart failure, according to a 2016 study. Transitions is part of a growing palliative care trend in the US, and health care consultant Kathleen Keer says physicians, hospitals and insurers are seeing value in these programs and are looking for ways to pay for them.

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Kaiser Health News
3/28/2017

California critical access hospitals are hiring physicians by taking advantage of a new state pilot program that allows exemptions to the state's corporate medicine ban. Peggy Wheeler of the California Hospital Association said at least half of the state's critical access hospitals are expected to use the program, which can help small, rural facilities with physician recruitment efforts.

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HealthLeaders Media