News for Providers
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/27/2016

Type 2 diabetes patients who received a nurse-led telemonitoring intervention had a mean A1C of 63.0 mmol/mol at the end of the intervention, compared with 67.8 mmol/mol among those in the usual care group, according to a UK study in PLOS Medicine. The findings, based on 321 patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes, revealed that those in the intervention group also had lower mean ambulatory systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure than the usual care group.

More Summaries:
blood pressure
7/27/2016

A study in the Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications showed that type 1 diabetes patients with higher levels of osteoprotegerin had a higher risk of foot ulcer, independent of other risk factors. Danish researchers also found an association between higher osteoprotegerin levels and the development of a combined endpoint of amputation, Charcot foot and vascular surgery.

More Summaries:
foot ulcer
7/27/2016

Insurers are increasingly willing to pay for genetic testing as the tests' costs have declined, but paying for genetic counseling to help patients understand their test results remains a reimbursement sticking point, says Adam Brufsky of the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Coverage varies depending on the test and the insurer, and genetic counselors can help patients minimize out-of-pocket costs, says Claudine Isaacs of the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Full Story:
OncLive
7/27/2016

State regulations and licensing laws often thwart patients' access to remotely provided care, and efforts at the federal level to streamline telemedicine have not been successful, economist Shirley Svorny writes. One way to improve access would be for Congress to define the practice location as where the provider is practicing rather than where the patient is, Svorny writes.

More Summaries:
Congress, Shirley Svorny
7/27/2016

Oncology researcher Tom Marsilje, a stage IV colon cancer patient, spent part of his summer vacation traveling the Midwest and visiting other patients with incurable cancer, some of whom he had only communicated with online. "There is a special bond between fellow cancer patients and survivors that is the deepest bond outside of a nuclear family that I have ever seen," Marsilje writes.

More Summaries:
cancer
7/27/2016

Researchers at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands developed an ultrahigh-performance time-of-flight PET detector, composed of a monolithic LYSO:Ce crystal scintillator with two digital silicon photomultiplier arrays in a dual-sided readout configuration, that would enable lower-dose PET imaging and improve resolution, sensitivity and scan times. The approach described in the journal Physics in Medicine and Biology, which is targeted for use in hybrid TOF PET/MRI and TOF PET/CT systems, "is crucial to the development and clinical implementation of personalized medicine approaches in many types of disease," said researcher Dr. Dennis Schaart.

7/27/2016

Claims data show about 10% of patients with Alzheimer's disease or other types of dementia had at least one preventable hospital stay in 2013, costing Medicare some $2.5 billion, researchers said at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference. The study suggested poor management of other chronic health problems, such as diabetes or heart disease, may be a reason for the hospitalizations.

Full Story:
HealthDay News
More Summaries:
Alzheimer's disease, Medicare
7/27/2016

Registered dietitian Liz Weiss says children are becoming more comfortable in the kitchen, perhaps because of the increasing number of TV shows that feature young chefs. Weiss said cooking helps to reinforce math, concentration and reading skills and that when children are involved in preparing meals, they are more likely to try new foods.

More Summaries:
Liz Weiss
7/27/2016

Health IT has grown beyond electronic health records to include health IT standards for health care delivery and quality measurement, said registered dietitian nutritionist Lindsey Hoggle. Dietitians do not have to be experts in informatics to improve their practice by using health IT tools, and can start by thinking about the nutrition data they use and what they are trying to measure, Hoggle said.

More Summaries:
RDN
7/27/2016

The farm-to-table movement is growing, spurred on by people who want a healthier and environmentally sustainable approach to nutrition, says registered dietitian LeeAnn Weintraub. People can start their own farm-to-table movement by finding out where the food and food ingredients they buy were grown, visiting farmers markets and talking with farmers, and telling friends and neighbors about the benefits of eating locally, Weintraub says.

More Summaries:
LeeAnn Weintraub