News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
8/18/2017

UK researchers found that 31.5%, 21.5% and 19% of children and teens who regularly skipped breakfast didn't meet the lower recommended intakes of iron, iodine and calcium, respectively, compared with only 4.4%, 3.3% and 2.9% of those who ate breakfast. The findings in the British Journal of Nutrition also showed that daily breakfast was missed by only 6.5% of youths ages 4 to 10, compared with almost 27% of those ages 11 to 18.

8/18/2017

White social workers who aim to follow the National Association of Social Workers' Code of Ethics should check in with minority clients in the wake of the Charlottesville, Va., violence and should take steps to educate themselves on the US white supremacist movement, writes social work professor Elspeth Slayter. She also recommends they speak out about their own views and examine how they may have benefited from white privilege.

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Social Work Helper
8/18/2017

A study in Diabetes Care found poorer medication adherence explained much of the gap between real-world and randomized controlled trial participants for changes in A1C following treatment with glucagonlike peptide-1 receptor agonists or DPP-IV inhibitors.

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diabetes
8/18/2017

McGill University researchers found that biological markers of Alzheimer's disease were most apparent among older adults who had the most difficulty determining odors. The findings in the journal Neurology, based on data involving 274 at-risk individuals with an average age of 63, suggest that smell tests could be used as a cheaper alternative in monitoring Alzheimer's progression, but more studies are needed in tracking changes in odor identification in relation to disease progression, researchers said.

8/18/2017

A tool has been developed to help clinicians discuss spiritual well-being with cancer patients in palliative care, regardless of the patient's specific religious faith. A report in the European Journal of Cancer Care noted the tool has been validated in 14 countries and 10 languages.

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palliative care
8/18/2017

US food manufacturers are making progress complying with an FDA order to replace partially hydrogenated oils, a key source of artificial trans fat, with healthier oils by June 2018. Registered dietitian Keri Gans says just because food is made with a healthier type of oil does not mean it is a healthy choice, so the diet rules about eating French fries still apply.

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Bloomberg
8/18/2017

Most people do not get enough eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, which are long-chain omega-3 fatty acids found in fish and fish oils, said registered dietitian Christy Brissette. Research links consumption of these omega-3s with lower heart disease risks, and DHA is important in prenatal care for development of an infant's brain and eyes, Brissette said.

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fatty acids, Christy Brissette, EPA
8/18/2017

Dietitian Romina Barritta de Defranchi says meal frequency varies among cultures worldwide and there is no consensus on how many daily meals are needed for good health. Meal quality and nutrient quantity are important, she says, and nutrition experts can help people adopt a holistic attitude about food.

8/18/2017

Researchers analyzed data from the Jackson Heart Study involving 3,252 black adults without diabetes at baseline and found an association between moving up in the modifiable lifestyle risk factor category and an 18% lower risk of developing incident diabetes. The findings in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine also revealed that participants with a body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or less who had average modifiable risk factor scores experienced a 40% reduced diabetes risk, while those with optimal risk scores dropped their risk by 47%, compared with those in the poor lifestyle group.

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body mass index
8/18/2017

Adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes who had high levels of self-compassion experienced lower A1C and higher well-being and engagement with all self-management behaviors, including physical activity and dietary care, according to an Australian study in Diabetic Medicine.