News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
3/29/2017

Researchers found an 89.2% reduction in waiting times for diabetic retinopathy screening -- from 158 days to 17 days -- after implementing telemedicine screening. The findings in JAMA Internal Medicine, based on 21,222 patients who underwent screening in 15 primary care clinics across Los Angeles County, Calif., revealed that annual screening rates for diabetic retinopathy also increased in a subset of clinics from 40.6% to 56.9% after the intervention.

3/29/2017

A study in Diabetes Care showed that patients with type 2 diabetes and preserved renal function experienced renal metabolism changes that may be beneficial for long-term kidney function following treatment with SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin, while those without diabetes had similar, but smaller changes. Italian researchers used a cohort of 66 diabetes patients and 25 healthy adults with normal glucose tolerance or prediabetes and found an increase in fractional glucose excretion in the fasted and fed states over a range of body mass index and creatinine clearance rates after 28 days of chronic therapy.

More Summaries:
Diabetes Care, body mass index
3/29/2017

Overweight or obese type 2 diabetes patients who engaged in light walking or light exercise had an improved fat-burning capacity and blood lipid profiles that were less inflammatory and had a greater capacity to fight inflammation, compared with patients who were sedentary, according to a study in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. Australian researchers evaluated the blood lipid profiles of 21 individuals and recommended "interrupting sitting every 30 minutes with a few minutes of light intensity activity, in addition to regularly taking part in a structured exercise program."

Full Story:
Reuters
More Summaries:
diabetes
3/29/2017

A study in Obesity Reviews showed that there are 79 rare genetic syndromes tied to obesity. Canadian researchers reviewed 161 scientific papers and found that 19 of the 79 syndromes identified had the genetics worked out completely, while 27 had been mapped to a chromosomal region, 11 had been partially clarified and 22 lacked identification of specific genes or chromosomal locations.

Full Story:
CNN
3/29/2017

Rush University Medical Center and Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers examined autopsies from 909 patients and found that most had one or two copies of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-type delta genetic variant tied to increased neurofibrillary tangles, which are associated with the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, dementia and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The findings in Molecular Psychiatry may prompt the discovery of potent targets for neurodegenerative disorder treatments, but further validation of the results is needed, researchers said.

More Summaries:
Alzheimer's disease
3/29/2017

A growing body of evidence links semi-dormant, or senescent, cells to aging-related conditions, including arthritis, cataracts and atherosclerosis, and a new study published in Cell showed that nudging the cells toward apoptosis might reverse changes associated with aging. Regular injections of a peptide that targets senescent cells improved fitness, kidney function and hair growth in mice engineered to age quickly. The researchers are planning a clinical trial of the peptide in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, in which cells have a marker similar to that in senescent cells.

Full Story:
The Guardian (London)
More Summaries:
glioblastoma multiforme
3/29/2017

Yo-yo dieting may result in weight gain over time, and for people at normal weight, research suggests it may increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes, said registered dietitian nutritionist Carrie Dennett. RDN Rebecca Scritchfield said instead of trying to control their weight, people should instead work to control their choices and adopt healthy lifestyle habits.

3/29/2017

Social workers at the Salt Lake City Police Department help clients address the linked problems of homelessness and addiction. The arrangement is said to be unusual because the police department employs the social workers directly, rather than using embedded social workers from county health departments.

3/29/2017

A new report blames a 2015 spike in early deaths among Americans aged 25 to 44 largely on suburban drug overdoses. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation report shows that "where people live plays a key role in how long and how well they live," said RWJF CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey.

Full Story:
USA Today
3/29/2017

Distribution of 100,000 naloxone kits to various agencies is part of New York City's new $38 million program to reduce opioid deaths over the next five years. The HealingNYC program seeks a 35% cut in a death toll that reached more than 1,000 in 2016.

Full Story:
Drug Topics