News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/17/2018

Research links a Mediterranean diet to multiple health benefits, but unlike commercial diets that spell out what foods to eat, a Mediterranean plan is more about maintaining a general lifestyle and eating pattern, said registered dietitian Suzy Weems. Weems and RD Liz Weinandy say fruits and vegetables are the focus of a Mediterranean style diet, along with nuts and legumes, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats.

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TIME online
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Suzy Weems, Liz Weinandy
1/17/2018

Veterinarian Julie Cavin has provided care to more than 850 cold-stunned sea turtles that have been rescued from unseasonably cold Florida waters since the first week of January and taken to the Gulf World Marine Institute. The comatose turtles are revived in small pools and examined for broken bones or other injuries, Dr. Cavin said.

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CBS News
1/17/2018

The p.Ser64Phe mutation in the MAFA gene is likely associated with a type of non-insulin-dependent diabetes and multiple insulin-producing neuroendocrine tumors, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. UK researchers studied the DNA of 39 adults from two families with diabetes and autosomal dominant insulinomatosis and nine people with sporadic insulinomatosis and found that "the p.Ser64Phe mutation not only significantly increased the stability of MAFA, whose levels were unaffected by variable glucose concentrations in [beta]-cell lines, but also enhanced its transactivation activity."

1/17/2018

Jeanne Henry of the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities says a common deficiency in regard to advance directives is that patient records often lack patient acknowledgement of advance directive receipt. States that have electronic advance directive registries make it easier to obtain and maintain patient directives.

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Becker's ASC Review
1/17/2018

Shine Medical Technologies has received $25 million from the federal government to build its $100 million radioisotope plant in Janesville, Wis., to produce molybdenum-99 in an effort to address the isotope's uncertain supply. Molybdenum-99 is sourced from six government-owned nuclear research reactors outside the US, but supply chain issues are a concern, and some federal scientists say major shortages are a possibility.

1/17/2018

Nutrition often is overlooked as a way to support thyroid function and prevent imbalances, says registered dietitian nutritionist Lisa Markley. Nutrition deficiencies and lifestyle can be factors in thyroid problems, she says, while iodine, tyrosine, selenium and other vitamins, along with foods that provide phytonutrients and antioxidants, can aid thyroid health.

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RDN
1/17/2018

The "Más Fresco," or "more fresh," program run by the University of California, San Diego, provides Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program beneficiaries match money when they purchase fresh fruits and vegetables. UCSD registered dietitian and program Senior Director Joe Prickitt said cost is a barrier to purchasing fresh produce, and the goal of the program is to determine whether more affordable produce leads to better overall health.

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National Public Radio
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UCSD, University of California
1/17/2018

A study in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that 50% of type 2 diabetes patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery reached targeted blood glucose, cholesterol and blood pressure levels related with diabetes control a year after the procedure, which dropped to 23% at five years; by comparison, 16% of those in the lifestyle intervention group experienced improved diabetes-related health issues after a year, which declined to 4% after five years. Another study in the same journal revealed that those who had weight-loss surgery had an up to 50% lower risk of dying than those who received usual care.

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HealthDay News
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blood glucose, blood pressure
1/17/2018

Researchers found that mothers who breast-fed their babies for at least six months had a 48% reduced risk of developing diabetes, compared with those who did not breast-feed at all. The findings in JAMA Internal Medicine, based on 1,238 mothers without diabetes at baseline, revealed that 10 of every 1,000 women who did not breast-feed at all developed diabetes every year, which declined to less than seven cases per 1,000 women who breast-fed babies for up to six months.

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Reuters
1/17/2018

A study in the journal PNAS found increased body mass index in the US was linked to 186,000 excess deaths in 2011, reducing life expectancy by about 11 months at age 40. Dr. Rekha Kumar commented that while opioid abuse is associated with shorter life expectancy in younger people, obesity contributes to overall lower life expectancy.

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HealthDay News
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opioid abuse