News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/21/2017

US rape victims often pay significant costs for medical tests and treatments incurred after reporting the crime, according to a study by the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. "With other violent crimes, victims are not responsible for paying for the damage that results from the crime," said lead author Ashley Tennessee.

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Reuters
4/21/2017

A bill to tighten requirements for returning children to their homes after removal has passed a committee vote in the North Carolina legislature. The bill would require social workers to observe and document two successful visits before reuniting children with their parents.

4/21/2017

A study in Arthritis & Rheumatology found use of mycophenolate for treating patients with systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease led to improvements in predicted forced vital capacity percentage, predicted diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, skin score and dyspnea, compared with placebo. The findings were based on 122 patients.

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carbon monoxide, Arthritis, dyspnea
4/21/2017

The CDC issued an alert warning clinicians about strains of Shigella that may have reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. The agency's Health Alert Network health advisory provides background on the emerging strains, which often have a quinolone-resistant gene that can make them less susceptible to fluoroquinolone antibiotics, and gives recommendations for diagnosing, managing and reporting Shigella infections.

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AAFP News
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CDC, ciprofloxacin
4/21/2017

Researchers found that worldwide investments of $4.60 per person per year to improve the physical, mental and sexual health of youths ages 10 to 19 could increase economic returns by tenfold and curb more than 30 million unwanted pregnancies and 12 million deaths. The findings in The Lancet also showed teen education spending of $22.60 per person per year could lead to 12 times higher economic returns and 12 million more formal jobs for young adults.

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HealthDay News
4/21/2017

Childhood exposure to familial deaths, parental substance abuse, parental mental health disorders, parental criminal behavior, residential instability or households receiving public assistance were linked to a nearly two times increased likelihood of suicide among teens and young adults, Swedish researchers reported in BMJ. The findings also showed a significantly higher suicide risk among those who experienced at least two adversities in childhood.

4/21/2017

Black children who reported discrimination were 78% more likely to develop asthma and had increased odds of experiencing poor asthma control, compared with those who didn't report discrimination, according to a study in the journal Chest. Researchers also found that discrimination and low economic status were tied to increased asthma risk among Mexican-American youths.

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asthma
4/21/2017

A study in the journal Neurology, based on 18 patients with severe brain injuries, found the more closely a patient's body temperature pattern matched a healthy person's circadian rhythm, the higher they scored on tests of recovery from coma.

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HealthDay News
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circadian rhythm
4/21/2017

An interagency drill dubbed Tranquil Shift, led by the State Department and HHS, tested their readiness to take on a possible large-scale evacuation of Americans from outside the US due to potential outbreaks of deadly diseases such as Ebola or other highly infectious diseases. Despite some glitches in the operation, "there were no lessons learned; there were lessons reinforced," according to Dr. William Walters, the State Department's managing director for operational medicine.

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State Department, Ebola, HHS
4/21/2017

Researchers at the University of Maryland's "Augmentarium," a virtual and augmented reality research lab, are working to create a headset that allows doctors to view and control images during surgery. Trauma surgeon and researcher Sarah Murthi said AR could make critical care more efficient, but others say the level of detail is not needed and could be distracting.

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SmithsonianMag.com