News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
1/22/2018

Thirty-eight percent of rural Minnesota restaurants participating in a community-based program to make their menus more heart-healthy adopted six of 16 healthy practices, according to research in Public Health Nutrition. Each restaurant got a consult with a dietitian, staff training and help with promotion, and the most common changes were offering whole grains, fruits, nonfried vegetables and smaller portions.

1/22/2018

The Syracuse City School District in New York has a student-run food committee that is gathering survey feedback on lunch menus from its high-school students. The comments may result in menu changes, but the district's director of food and nutrition service, registered dietitian Rachel Murphy, said all foods offered will align with state and federal nutrition standards.

1/22/2018

An infantryman turned military mental health specialist worries that high suicides and post-traumatic stress disorder rates among service members will increase as Washington ramps up military action. Citing his own experience, Rick Rogers says the military culture encourages substance use and discourages seeking help.

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1/22/2018

City officials in Los Angeles have proposed setting up trailers to replace homeless encampments that have sprung up around El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument. Tentative plans call for three trailers to house 60 people for up to six months, with another trailer for showers and toilets and a fifth staffed by social workers.

1/22/2018

Legal immigrants' fear of deportation of their relatives has led to a sharp drop in their use of public health services and enrollment in federally subsidized medical insurance since Donald Trump became president, advocates say. "One social worker said she had a client who was forgoing chemotherapy because she had a child that was not here legally," said Oscar Gomez, CEO of Health Outreach Partners.

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Donald Trump, public health
1/22/2018

While proposing budget cuts for most state agencies, Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin seeks $10.8 million for a new adoption and foster care program and $24 million to add social workers and raise their pay. Bevin also proposes channeling $34 million from tobacco settlement funds into fighting opioid abuse.

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Gov. Matt Bevin, opioid abuse
1/22/2018

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott wants public input on a 13-page state plan to rectify previous failures to provide special education services to qualifying students. The plan calls for hiring more special education staff and providing more services, and it is in addition to a federal plan requiring the state to evaluate students who were illegally denied services.

1/22/2018

The percentage of children with inflammatory bowel disease who received flu immunizations rose from 10% during the 2015-2016 season to 58% during the 2016-2017 season, after the implementation of a two-step quality improvement program, which included providing flu vaccines in the IBD clinic and having physicians record flu vaccine recommendations in EHRs, according to a study presented at the Crohn's and Colitis Congress. Researchers also found that the documentation rate of physician's vaccine recommendations increased from 46% to 82% during the same period.

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flu, flu vaccine, IBD, IBD, bowel disease
1/22/2018

Adolescents with depression who refused or stopped taking antidepressants and underwent brief cognitive behavioral therapy in addition to standard treatment had 26.8 more depression-free days and 0.067 more quality-adjusted life-years over 12 months, as well as reduced costs of $4,976 at 24 months' follow-up, compared with those who received standard treatment alone, researchers reported in Pediatrics. The findings were based on data involving 212 teens in Kaiser Permanente primary care clinics in Oregon and Washington.

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1/22/2018

A study in Pediatrics showed that low-income Brazilian youths in free child care centers that provided monthly reading workshops for parents aimed at promoting reading aloud to children and increasing parent-child interaction scored better cognitive skills, language and memory tests by the end of the school year, compared with those in centers without the program. The findings suggest that the program may also be used to help parents in other countries read with their children, said lead researcher Adriana Weisleder.

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Reuters