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Top stories summarized by our editors
2/17/2017

Sedentary patients with dysregulated type 2 diabetes showed no improvement in early diastolic myocardial tissue velocity and in the ratio of early and atrial mitral annular tissue velocities 16 weeks after being treated with liraglutide, combined with supervised exercise, while those on placebo did see improvements with exercise, according to a study in Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Danish researchers used a cohort of 33 patients and found no significant difference in left ventricular structure or function and heart rate within or between the two groups.

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diabetes, heart rate
2/17/2017

Researchers found that 29% and 23% of type 2 diabetes patients with obesity who underwent gastric bypass surgery and sleeve gastrectomy, respectively, were able to stop their diabetes medications five years after the procedure, compared with 5% of those on diabetes medications alone. The findings in the New England Journal of Medicine, based on 150 patients, showed those who underwent weight-loss surgery lost significantly more weight and had lower blood glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol levels.

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HealthDay News
2/17/2017

A study in Science Translational Medicine showed that adults who consumed a low-calorie, fasting-mimicking diet for five days once a month over three months reduced their cardiovascular risk factors, including fasting glucose, metabolism hormone IGF-1 levels, blood pressure and signs of inflammation. Researchers found those in the fasting-mimicking diet also lost weight and inches around their waist, reducing their risk of diabetes, heart disease, cancer and other diseases.

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blood pressure, diabetes
2/17/2017

ProMedica Toledo Hospital in Ohio has designed a construction project to improve nursing care by reducing the time and distance needed to walk during shifts. Designers followed nurses in intensive care and medical-surgical units and worked to reduce the presence of long corridors and to make supplies available in multiple locations.

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HealthLeaders Media
2/17/2017

Mary Ann McLaughlin, medical director of the Cardiac Health Program at Mount Sinai Health System, says many women are unaware that they have heart disease, but all women can protect themselves by knowing the symptoms of a heart attack, reducing stress, limiting alcohol consumption, and staying hydrated and active during airline flights. She also suggests that older women undergo a stress test if heart disease runs in their families or if they are obese.

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HealthDay News
2/17/2017

West Virginia University researchers have developed a helmet PET scanner containing smaller detectors with crystal arrays that can detect the degree of brain injury caused by stroke within 30 seconds, reducing patients' risk of developing severe disabilities. The device, described at the American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, also has the potential to improve sports concussion diagnoses and could be available for clinical use within two years, researchers said.

2/17/2017

Research provides conflicting data on whether cranberries can help prevent urinary tract infections, experts said, but overall good hydration may help patients avoid bacterial growth in the urinary tract that can lead to UTIs. Registered dietitian Barbara Hopkins said dietitians can counsel patients on developing a healthy gut through a plant-based diet that also includes probiotics and cranberry products.

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Today's Dietitian
2/17/2017

Cooking for one or two people can be a challenge, and meals can become limited and rely too much on processed foods, said registered dietitian Rita Smith. She says seniors or empty-nesters can cook larger batches and freeze smaller portions, share foods with a neighbor, and buy frozen fruits and vegetables so food does not go to waste.

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Rita Smith
2/17/2017

A low-sodium diet reduced blood pressure and improved hydration status in chronic kidney disease patients, when compared with a control group that maintained their usual diet, according to a study in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. University of Michigan researcher Rajiv Saran said the sodium-restricted diet included meals created and prepared by study participants based on counseling from dietitians.

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CKD, blood pressure
2/17/2017

Exercise to strengthen the gluteus medius, the muscle that controls pelvic motion, is important because the gluteus medius helps keep the pelvis stable during activities, says physical therapist Skye Donovan. An unstable pelvis can led to knee, hip and lower back pain, Donovan says.