News for Providers
Top stories summarized by our editors
2/22/2017

Average life expectancy across the world is expected to increase by 2030, with South Koreans having the highest life expectancy and the US being among developed countries with the lowest, according to a study in The Lancet. UK researchers and the World Health Organization found that men and women in the US are expected to live 79.5 and 83.3 years, respectively.

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Reuters
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World Health Organization
2/22/2017

The Defense Department will sustain the Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application, the agency's legacy EHR system, until the full deployment of Cerner's MHS Genesis system in 2022, said Air Force Col. Richard Terry, acting Military Health System CIO. "We're going to continue to leverage the Joint Legacy Viewer to meet our interoperability needs to share data between the DOD and VA," said Stacy Cummings, program executive officer for Defense Healthcare Management Systems.

2/22/2017

A study in Diabetes Care showed that type 2 diabetes patients with and without neuropathy have reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation, compared with patients with cryptogenic axonal polyneuropathy and healthy individuals. Dutch researchers used a cohort of 26 diabetes patients with and without polyneuropathy, 16 patients with CAP and 16 healthy controls and found those with polyneuropathy and CAP showed a similar drop in sural sensory nerve action potential and intraepidermal nerve fiber density.

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Diabetes Care, polyneuropathy
2/22/2017

Data from a series of studies showed testosterone therapy for older men with low testosterone levels may increase bone density and reduce anemia, but were mixed on whether it affects cardiovascular risks. The studies, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association and JAMA Internal Medicine, found after one year of testosterone treatment there were no significant changes in memory or problem-solving.

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testosterone
2/22/2017

Regular consumption of seafood high in mercury, such as swordfish and shark, may increase the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, according to a study to be released at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting. The study, which included people with and without ALS, found those who ate the most mercury-heavy seafood had twice the risk of ALS.

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HealthDay News
2/22/2017

A study in the journal Childhood Obesity found that infants who received antibiotics within the first six months of life had increased odds of developing obesity at age 2 years, compared with those who didn't receive antibiotics. The findings, based on 2012 to 2013 data involving babies of 97 Hispanic mothers, also showed an independent link between rapid infant weight gain and obesity at age 2.

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Childhood Obesity, Obesity
2/22/2017

Utah's Logan Regional Hospital will stop selling beverages and snacks with excess sugar next month, replacing them with healthier options. Logan joins other Intermountain Healthcare facilities in making the change, which Robin Aufdenkampe, Intermountain's director of food and nutrition services, says is aimed at making people more aware of added sugars and how to avoid them.

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Intermountain Healthcare
2/22/2017

Senate Health Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., and Ranking Member Patty Murray, D-Wash., along with four other high-ranking lawmakers have sent a letter to Congress affirming their support for the safety and efficacy of FDA-licensed vaccines. "As members of Congress, we have a critical role to play in supporting the availability and use of vaccines to protect Americans from deadly diseases," the legislators wrote.

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The Hill, HealthDay News
2/22/2017

Pfizer's biologics license application for inotuzumab ozogamicin has been accepted for priority review by the FDA as a treatment for relapsed or refractory B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The agency's action date is in August.

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BioCentury
2/22/2017

German researchers found that severe hypoglycemic episodes increased by 15% in colder climates and by 18% in higher temperatures, compared with an average comfort zone. The findings in the Journal of Diabetes and its Complications, based on more than 2,500 residents in Hamburg, Germany, revealed that the rate of severe hypoglycemic events that happened outside rose to 13% in cooler conditions and 21% in higher temperatures, compared with an overall average of 8%.

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Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.)