News for Providers
Top editor picks, summarized for you
5/6/2016

Only 1% of cities have air pollution bad enough that the health risks of cycling for 30 minutes per day outside are higher than the benefits of the exercise, according to a study in the journal Preventive Medicine. Researchers did computer simulations to analyze pollution levels and the risks and benefits of walking or cycling outdoors.

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HealthDay News
5/6/2016

After being apart, three owners and their dogs both experienced a drop in heart rate upon being reunited, according to new research. The syncing of heart rates occurred rapidly and suggests a mutual reduction in stress, researchers said.

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Tech Times
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heart rate
5/6/2016

A study in Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases found lifestyle interventions using individual and group sessions helped improve depression scores among diabetes patients, but online and telephone sessions did not improve depression scores. Researchers evaluated 19 international studies involving 9,107 patients with or at risk for type 2 diabetes who had a depression assessment.

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depression, diabetes
5/6/2016

UK researchers found every 5mg per day increase of prednisolone, a glucocorticoid, increased the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 25% to 30%, but there was no association between a dose of less than 5mg and diabetes risk, compared to no treatment. The findings in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatology, based on 32,600 US and UK patients with rheumatoid arthritis, showed that the diabetes risk was only affected by the prednisolone dose in the most recent six months.

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Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.)
5/6/2016

A study presented at the annual Pediatric Academic Societies meeting showed that adolescents with type 1 diabetes who attended monthly videoconference sessions with a diabetes nurse educator and social worker for six months had mean improvements in the four self-care inventory subscales, but no improvements in glycemic control, compared to those who received usual care. Researchers used a cohort of 32 children with type 1 diabetes and an A1C of at least 8%, ages 13 to 17, and found that greatest between-group differences were in the "insulin and food regulation" subscale.

5/6/2016

National Nurses Week begins today, and the theme includes a focus on building a culture of safety for patients and nurses, ANA President Pamela Cipriano writes. In this article, Cipriano debunks four common myths about nurses, explaining that: The job is not easy, the nation does not have enough nurses, nurses are not all the same, and nurses are not an extension of physicians.

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The Huffington Post
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Pamela Cipriano
5/6/2016

The nursing staff shortage being felt throughout the country is one of the factors causing nurse burnout, but good leadership can and should be able to effect a lower turnover rate. In response to the need to rejuvenate overworked staff, some hospitals have created "renewal rooms," where nurses can lounge in a massage chair or listen to soothing music to refresh their weary bodies.

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public health
5/6/2016

Researchers are studying how players handle the 3D levels of the video game "Sea Hero Quest" because spatial awareness can be one of the first skills lost by dementia patients. Researcher Hugo Spiers said the game is not a test for dementia, but it generates useful data about navigation skills faster than laboratory experiments.

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BBC
5/6/2016

Researchers looked at SPECT and MRI scans of a 17-year-old native Belgian Dutch boy who speaks with a French accent and found abnormalities in parts of the brain involved with planning and execution, yielding aberrations in speech and other issues. They also found deficiencies in the cerebellum's contralateral hemisphere. The findings, reported in Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, suggest that the boy's manner of speaking, called foreign accent syndrome, is linked to disrupted pathways between the brain's language centers and the cerebellum. The condition is rare and usually develops after stroke.

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foreign accent syndrome
5/6/2016

Some studies suggest a link between certain foods and Parkinson's disease risk but proper nutrition also may help reduce symptoms, writes registered dietitian Matt Ruscigno. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says dietary goals for PD patients include reducing constipation, good hydration, adequate energy and preventing bone thinning, and Ruscigno said RDs have the opportunity to educate patients about the importance of good nutrition as part of treatment plans.

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Today's Dietitian