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7/26/2016

A German study in Diabetologia showed that women with gestational diabetes who breastfed for more than three months had different metabolites than women who didn't breastfeed, which may explain their protection from developing type 2 diabetes.

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Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.)
7/26/2016

UK researchers found that type 2 diabetes patients who received the flu vaccine had a 24% lower rate of all-cause mortality, as well as lower hospitalization rates for heart failure, pneumonia or influenza, and stroke, compared with those who weren't vaccinated. The findings in the Canadian Medical Association Journal were based on nearly 125,000 patients with type 2 diabetes in England.

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Reuters
7/26/2016

The hospitalization rate for mental health or substance abuse among young adults with diabetes, ages 19 to 25, was 68% higher in 2014 than in 2012, according to a study from the Health Care Cost Institute. Researchers evaluated the insurance claims of more than 40 million people younger than 65 from 2012 to 2014 and found that the rate of hospitalization for mental health or substance abuse among children with diabetes, ages up to age 18, was 21 per 1,000 in 2014.

7/26/2016

The Health Resources and Services Administration has announced the awarding of $149 million in federal grants for hospitals and health care organizations to support health care training initiatives, including advanced practice registered nurse education. The grants are intended to improve access to care in high-need areas.

7/26/2016

Stress relief can be important for those working in health care facilities, and nurses at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia have held pet fairs that brought in dogs and cats for cuddling and petting. Terry Foster of St. Elizabeth Healthcare in Kentucky advocates laughter during social time as a powerful antidote for stress relief.

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Nurse.com
7/26/2016

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis who used PET and the novel tau radiotracer F-18 AV-1451 found that patients with Alzheimer's disease had increased tracer levels in the hippocampus and cortical areas associated with Alzheimer's disease. The findings in JAMA Neurology, based on 59 male and female participants with and without Alzheimer's and with a mean age of 74, also showed that beta-amyloid accumulation alone didn't affect cortical thickness or hippocampal volume, prompting researchers to suggest that interactions between beta-amyloid proteins and hippocampal and cortical tau pathology influence Alzheimer's disease progression.

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Alzheimer's disease
7/26/2016

Interpretations of density in breast tissue vary widely, according to a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Thirty-seven percent of the women studied had dense breasts, but some radiologists classified as few as 7% as having dense tissue while others ranked 85% as having dense breasts, which predisposes women to cancer.

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FoxNews.com
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Annals of Internal Medicine
7/26/2016

Studies show intermittent fasting diets may not lead to greater weight loss than reducing calorie intake each day, said registered dietitian Christy Brissette. Even though a common worry is that intermittent fasting leads to over-eating on non-fasting days, Brissette says research does not indicate that is true.

7/26/2016

In the Journal of the American College of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System researchers noted that 33% of patients accessing medical data through portals were interested in imaging results, while just 0.1% inquired about radiation exposure. Women were more likely than men to submit a message, and results were distributed a median of five days after imaging, but median radiology turnaround time was just five hours.

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HealthImaging.com
7/26/2016

Intuitive eating is a better strategy for weight loss than dieting but the idea can seem abstract, so dietitians suggest creating a flexible structure that guides decision-making. Registered dietitian nutritionist Lauren Fowler recommends tracking hunger and fullness cues and creating a flexible weekly dinner plan, while RDN Erica Hansen says people should focus on what they can eat more of to satisfy hunger.