News for Providers
Top editor picks, summarized for you
7/31/2015

HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell has sought input from governors around the U.S. to craft a $100 million strategy for addressing and preventing prescription painkiller abuse. The initiative includes funding for drugs to treat overdose and addiction, and waivers for states to try innovative treatment approaches.

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The Hill
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HHS, Sylvia Mathews Burwell
7/31/2015

Individuals who stood for an extra two hours daily had about 2% lower blood glucose levels and 11% lower average triglycerides, compared to those who spent more time sitting, according to an Australian study in the European Heart Journal. Researchers also found that more time spent standing was associated with increased HDL cholesterol levels and decreased LDL cholesterol levels. Blood glucose levels and triglycerides dropped by about 11% and 14%, respectively, for every two hours spent walking instead of sitting.

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HealthDay News
7/31/2015

A Validic survey found that 59% of more than 450 health care groups either didn't have a digital health strategy or were behind schedule in implementing one. Forty-one percent reported being on schedule.

7/31/2015

Researchers found that urban-area adults with diabetes saw their mean A1C levels drop by 0.9% and had improvements in self-care activities and medication adherence after receiving telephone counseling with community-based health educators, compared with a 0.5% drop among those who were given only printed diabetes self-management materials. The findings in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine were based on 941 adults with diabetes and A1C levels greater than 7%.

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diabetes
7/31/2015

A bill introduced by Rep. Renee Ellmers, R-N.C., on Thursday would postpone the final stage of meaningful use, putting off rulemaking for stage 3 until 2017. The American Medical Association endorsed the proposal, saying that more flexibility is needed in MU standards and that the final stage needs to be aligned with other efforts to advance the health care system in the U.S.

7/31/2015

More nurses and physicians are needed, particularly in primary care, as the 50th anniversary of Medicare and Medicaid is observed this week. Medicare and Medicaid paid $15 billion toward residency training programs in 2012, and the Association of American Medical Colleges has predicted a shortage of between 46,000 and 90,000 physicians by 2025. ANA has projected more openings for registered nurses than any other job in the U.S. through 2022 and advocated for increased federal funding for nurse training. "We're seeing mixed signals today in the nurse employment market. There have been layoffs by some hospitals at the same time that 'registered nurse' ranks as the most advertised position nationwide," ANA President Pamela Cipriano said.

7/31/2015

A study published in EBioMedicine categorizes prostate cancer into five distinct subtypes based on the genetic fingerprints of tumors. The researchers zeroed in on 100 genes associated with prostate cancer, 94 of which had not been linked previously to the disease, and a subset of that 100-gene panel outperformed traditional methods for predicting poor prognosis. Researchers can now begin work on developing targeted approaches to treatment.

7/31/2015

Only about one-third of almost 1,600 older adults with diabetes had their disease under control as defined by American Diabetes Association guidelines, researchers wrote in the journal Diabetes Care. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health said data showed racial disparities, particularly among women, in measures of diabetes control.

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HealthDay News
7/31/2015

Researchers said primary caregivers with adequate levels of health literacy were more likely to use or recommend weight-loss strategies for children, compared with those who had low health literacy. The study in the journal Appetite showed 58% of caregivers with adequate health literacy endorsed government-recommended pediatric weight-loss strategies, such as eating more fruits and vegetables, increasing exercise and reducing fat intake, compared with 24% of those with low health literacy.

7/31/2015

Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who received a modified three-drug regimen with multiple doses of rituximab had outcomes comparable to a historical cohort who received the same regimen with single-dose rituximab, according to a study in the journal Cancer. The single-arm trial found an overall response rate of 97%, while 75% of patients experienced complete remission. The regimens also included fludarabine and cyclophosphamide.

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