All Health Care News
Top stories summarized by our editors
4/26/2017

A study in the Journal of the Endocrine Society showed that children with obesity had an almost four times increased risk of developing incident type 2 diabetes before reaching adulthood, compared with those with a normal body mass index. UK researchers used a cohort of 369,361 children ages 2 to 15 and found a 1.6-fold increase in diabetes risk for every 1 standard deviation increase in BMI z score.

More Summaries:
Obesity, body mass index
4/26/2017

An amendment to Republican health care legislation proposes letting states seek waivers to opt out of the Affordable Care Act's community rating requirements, but they would have to have a high-risk pool available for consumers with pre-existing conditions, according to legislative text circulated by House Republicans. States could also seek waivers to opt out of essential health benefits requirements, and states applying for waivers would only need to meet one of numerous possible criteria, such as increasing choice of plans or reducing premiums.

Full Story:
The Hill, Politico
4/26/2017

The US Preventive Services Task Force published updated guidelines in the Journal of the American Medical Association that call for all pregnant women to undergo routine blood pressure monitoring at every prenatal visit to screen for preeclampsia, regardless of whether they have a history of preeclampsia or high blood pressure. Separate guidelines call for pregnant women with a higher risk of preeclampsia to take low-dose aspirin after 12 weeks of pregnancy.

Full Story:
Reuters
4/26/2017

UK and Norwegian researchers found that children who received emotional feeding or food to soothe negative feelings from their parents at ages 4 and 6 were more likely to develop emotional eating at ages 8 and 10, while those who were more easily comforted by food had increased odds of being emotionally fed. The findings in the journal Child Development were based on data involving 800 youths in Norway.

Full Story:
CBS News
4/26/2017

It is important to remove sources of lead from the home, such as lead-based paint and certain pottery or candy, and address problems with lead in tap water to prevent children from ingesting it, according to nutrition and pediatric experts. Diet also is important, and registered dietitian nutritionist Kristi King said vitamin C helps the body absorb iron to prevent lead absorption and vitamin B1 can help reduce blood levels of lead.

More Summaries:
vitamin C
4/26/2017

Frequent consumption of flavored waters, either carbonated or still, may damage teeth, writes registered dietitian nutritionist Ellie Krieger. Edmond Hewlett, a professor at the University of California-Los Angeles School of Dentistry, said the citric and fruit acids in flavored waters can erode teeth and affect their structural integrity.

More Summaries:
Ellie Krieger
4/26/2017

Eating different foods changes the balance of bacteria in the gut, and experiments with fruit flies shows that certain gut bacteria can stimulate appetite for nutrients missing in the diet. The findings, published in PLOS Biology, suggest that gut-brain communication might be a basis for future treatments, senior author Carlos Ribeiro says.

4/26/2017

A study presented at the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology's annual meeting showed the phenols in cinnamon may interact with the protein Sirt-1, which is involved in insulin regulation. That may help explain earlier study results showing people with type 2 diabetes who took cinnamon supplements had greater reductions in blood glucose levels than those who took a placebo.

Full Story:
Time.com
More Summaries:
blood glucose
4/26/2017

Physical activity may be a risk reduction factor for heart failure in adults, including for those who are obese, researchers said. Their study in the journal JACC: Heart Failure showed that compared with people who followed recommended exercise guidelines, those who did not exercise had a 39% higher risk of heart damage.

4/26/2017

A Nevada school district's Menu Concept Expo allowed students to taste-test 20 food items and provide feedback, which registered dietitian Lori Hayon said would be used in determining menu choices for the next school year. Hayon said the biggest challenge is coming up with recipes that comply with federal nutrition guidelines, but the Nevada school district gets help from culinary chefs and their students to help make healthy recipes taste better.